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1914 














The Woman's College of 

The University of North Carolina 

LIBRARY 





Gift of 
Mary Terment 



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The Annual Published By The Mernters 
of The Senior Qass of The S+a+e 
Normal and Industrial (pllecje 



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Greensboro, N.C 




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FOREWORD 



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N tkis, tke fifth Volume of tke 
Carolinian, it is our aim, by 
means of sketches grav"e and 
gay\ songs merry ana sad, pic- 
tures of light and shade, to image 
our checkered life at the Normal. 
We hope that our readers will like 
the reflection as w"e like the life. 
To those who have contributed to 
this varied scheme, and to our 
Advisory^ Board, who, by their 
kindly counsel, have endeavored 
to hold us to a happy mean, wte 
gK>e our cordial thanks. 




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Contents 

INTRODUCTORY 

Foreword 7 

Contents 8-9 

Dedication II 

Board of Directors 12 

In Memoriam 13 

Carolinian Board 14-15 

THE COLLEGE 

Julius I. Foust, President 19 

Cpllege Calendar 21 

Faculty 22-28 

Toast to College 29 

The College (1913-M4) 30-36 

The College Song 37 






1 



THE CLASSES 

Senior 41-84 

Junior 85-95 

Sophomore 96-99 

Freshman 100-104 

Commercial , 105 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Y. W. C. A 109-1 1 1 

The Student Volunteer Band 1 12-1 13 

The Blue Ridge Club 114 

Societies 115-116 

Adelphian Literary Society 1 1 7- 1 26 

Cornelian Literary Society 127-136 

The Marshals 1 37- 1 39 

Debaters 140-141 

Magazine Staff 1 42- 1 43 

The Student Council 1 44- 1 45 

The College Chorus and Orchestra 1 46- 1 48 

Unser Deutsche Kraenzchen 1 49 

Current Topics Club 1 50- 1 5 1 

Carolina Pen Points 152 

Dramatics 1 53- 1 70 

ATHLETICS 

The Athletic Association 1 73- 1 74 

Field Day Records 175 

Hockey Teams , 176-189 

Champion Tennis Team 181 

Basketball Teams 1 82- 1 84 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Inside View of the College — Normal Recipes — Senior Statistics — 
Senior English — Senior Gym — As Seniors Dream — The Pensive Gaze — 
Last Will and Testament of the Class of 1914 — Labor Day — Seven 

Wonders 198-220 

Acknowledgment 221 

Before — After 222-223 

The End 224 

Advertisements „ 225 



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RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO 




U' 

V 
\ 


DR. EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN 
DR. PHILANDER PRIESTLY CLAXTON 
AND DR. JAMES YADKIN JOYNER 






TO THREE FIRM FRIENDS WHO LABORED FOR OUR COLLEGE 
BEFORE HER FOUNDATION, WHO NURTURED HER IN HER IN 
FANCY, AND WHO, THOUGH NOW ACTIVE IN OTHER FIELDS 
OF SERVICE, ARE NOT UNMINDFUL OF HER, THE CLASS OF 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FOURTEEN HONORS ITSELF IN 
DEDICATING THIS VOLUME OF TH£ CAROLINIAN 





f 



Board of Directors 

T. B. Bailey Davie County 

A. J. Conner Northampton County 

J. W. HlNSHAW Forsyth County 

Henry E. Litchford Wake County 

J. Y. Joyner Wake County 

C. H. MEBANE • Catawba County 

J. D. Murphy Buncombe County 

J. L. Nelson Caldwell County 

WALKER TAYLOR New Hanover County 

T. S. McMullan Perquimans County 

Joe Rosenthal Wayne County 



Page /n>e/ve 




Enta (Sttfiger, '13 



Page thirteen 



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( 




CAROLINIAN BOARD 



Page fourteen 



Carolinian Board 

Sarah Perrin Shuford Editor-in-Chief 

Literary Editors 

Bertha Stanbury Ruth Gunter 

Anne Watkins Edith Avery, '15 

Ethel Thomas, '15 Margaret Harper, '16 

Marianne Richards, '17 Mary Green 

Business Managers Advertising Managers 

Winifred Turlington Manager Margaret Smith Manager 

Bessie Terry Assistant Louise Bell Assistant Manager 

Picture Editors 

Gladys Goodson Editor 

Elizabeth Hall Assistant 

Ruth Hampton Art Editor 



Page fifteen 




The 
University 




Page nineteen 



^ 




COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1913 

SEPTEMBER 17. WEDNESDAY 

Examinations begin. 

For New Students 
Registration. 
Entrance Examinations. 
Examinations for advanced standing. 



1914 

JANUARY 26. MONDAY' 
Spring term begins. 

FEBRUARY 22 

Washington's Birthday — holiday. ' 

MAY 23. 24. 25, 26, SATURDAY. SUNDAY. 
MONDAY AND TUESDAY 



For Former Students. 


Commencement Exercises. 





Examinations for removal of conditions. 
Examinations (or advanced standing. 


JUNE I, MONDAY 


TEMBER 20. SATURDAY 


Summer Session begins. 






Examinations end. 

Registration of former students. 

Registration of students who enter by certific; 

SEPTEMBER 22, MONDAY 
Regular college work begins. 

OCTOBER 5 ' 
Founder's Day 

NOVEMBER 27 THURSDAY 

Thanksgiving holiday 

CHRISTMAS 

Recess from December 24 to January 5. 

elusive 



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Page irventy-one 




Page twenty -two 



Offi 



cers 



Julius I. Foust, LL.D President 

William C. Smith Dean of the Faculty 

Junius A. Matheson Dean of the College 

Sue May Kirkland , Lady Principal 

Grace Huse, M.D Physician 

E. J. Forney Bursar 

Laura H. Coit Secretary 

Edith Imes , Dietitian 

Mary Taylor Moore , Registrar 

EsTELLE Boyd Housekeeper 

Jane T. Miller, A.B., B.D General Secretary Y. W . C. A. 

Annie F. Petty Librarian 

Mary Mullen Assistant Librarian 

Mary Tennent Assistant Registrar 

Oeland Washburn Stenographer 

Pattie McAdams Trained Nurse 

Eliza N. Woollard Assistant Nurse 



Page tTventy-three 




Faculty 



JULIUS I. FOUST. LL.D. 

President 

Graduate University of N. C. ; Principal Goldsboro Schools; Super- 
intendent of Wilson Schools; Superintendent Goldsboro Schools; 
Instructor in Pedagogy, State Normal College; President State Nor- 
mal College. 

WILLIAM C. SMITH 

English Language and Literature 

Graduate University of N. C. ; Instructor in History and Pedagogy, 
University of N. C. ; Instructor in English. University of N. C. ; 
Professor of History, State Normal College; Professor of English, 
State Normal College; Dean of Faculty. 

JUNIUS A. MATHESON 

Pedagogy 

Graduate Davidson College; Superintendent Durham Schools; Student 
Columbia University ; President N. C. Teachers' Assembly; Depart- 
ment of Education, State Normal College; Dean of the College. 

GERTRUDE WHITTIER MENDENHALL, B.S. 

Mathematics 

B. S. Wellesley College; Teacher of Mathematics, Peace Institute and 
Guilford College; Head of Mathematics Department, State Normal 
College ; Student at Bryn Mawr College, Columbia, Harvard, and 
Chicago Universities. 

EUGENE WILLIS GUDGER, M.S., Ph.D. 

Biology and Geology 

Graduate Emory and Henry College; Peabody Normal College; B. S. 
and M. S. University of Nashville; Ph. D. Johns Hopkins University: 
Instructor in Sciences at Asheville, N. C. and Little Rock, Ark. ; 
Laboratory Assistant in Biology. Johns Hopkins University; Profes- 
sor of Biology and Geology, State Normal College; Scientific Assist- 
ant and Investigator U. S. Bureau of Fisheries; Investigator Mar'ne 
Biological Laboratory of Carnegie Institution of Washington; Secre- 
tary of N. C. Academy of Science; Fellow and Member of Council 
of American Association for Advancement of Science. 



GRACE HUSE, M.D. 
Physiology and Hygiene 

A. B. Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.; M. D. Woman's Medi- 
cal College of Pa.; Resident Physician, State Normal College. 

WILLIAM C. A. HAMMEL 

Physics and Manual Arts 

A. B. Baltimore City College; Johns Hopkins University; Director 
of Physics and Manual Training, Baltimore, School of Md., N. C. 
State Normal College. Writer on Physics and Manual Training. First 
to discover that a magnet can affect a sensitive photo plate. 

MARY M. PETTY, B. S. 
Chemistry 

B. S. Wellesley College; Fellow in Chemistry at Bryn Mawr College; 
Instructor in Chemistry: Statesville College, Guilford College, State 
Normal College. 

MARY SETTLE SHARPE 

Expression 

Graduate St. Mary's School; Student Emerson School of Oratory; 
Instructor in Expression, State Normal College. 

VIOLA BODDIE 

Latin 

Graduate Peabody Normal College; Student Cornell University; Ber- 
litz School of Languages, Chicago and Chautauqua; Head of Latin 
Department, State Normal College. 

HINDA TEAGUE HILL, A.B. 

French 

Student University of Berlin ; Alliasce Francoise, Paris; Graduate 
Work, Chicago University; Head of French Department, State Nor- 
mal College. 



Page twenty- four 



r 




FACULTY 



CHRISTINE R. A. REINCKEN 

German 

Student at Universities of Zurich, Leipzig, and Harvard; Instructor 
.n German at Milwaukee Downer- College, and "Ward Seminary; Head 
of German Department, State Noimal College. 

WALTER CLINTON JACKSON 

History and Sociology 

Graduate Mercer University, Macon, Ga. ; Student at Columbia Uni- 
versity ; Principal City High School, Greensboro, N. C. ; Assistant 
Superintendent of the "Vacation Bible Schools of New York City; 
Head of History Department, State Normal College. 

WADE R. BROWN 

Piano, Organ, and Theory 

Baker University; Artists and Teachers Diploma, New England Con- 
servatory of Music; Pupil of A. K. Vergil, N. Y. ; Sternschen Con- 
servatorium, Berlin; Dr. Ernest Jedliezka, Berlin; R. Huntington 
Woodman; I. Philipp, Paris; Head of Music Department, Meredith 
College; Head of Music Department, State Normal College. 



CHARLES J. BROCKMANN 
Stringed Instruments and Piano 



Studied in New York and Berlin ; Conducted School of Music in 
Greensboro; Taught in Salem Academy and Greensboro Female 
College. 

MELVILLE VINCENT FORT 

Industrial Drawing and Art 

Student Mississippi Industrial College; Art Schools of New York, 
Cincinnati, and Chicago. 

MINNIE L. JAMISON 

Domestic Science 

Graduate State Normal College; Head of Domestic Science 
Department. 



E. J. FORNEY 

Stenography, Typewriting, and Bookkeeping 
Student Catawba College; Bursar of College. 

ROBERT AMZI MERRITT 

Psychology nnd History of Education 

A. B. University of N. C. ; Student Columbia University. 

ALMA I. LONG 
Domestic Art 

ERNEST ELWELL BALCOMB, A.B. 

Agriculture and Physical Geography 

A. B. Stanford University; Advanced Courses. Harvard and Columbia 
Universities, and University of California; State Supervisor of Agri- 
cultural Education for Oklahoma; President and Secretary of the 
Department of Rural Education of the National Educational Associ- 
ation; Instructor in State Normal Schools at Monmouth, Oregon; 
Providence. P.. I.; and Weatherfor d, okla. 

LAURA McALLESTER 
Physical Culture 



Boston Normal School of Gymnastics 
Schools. 



Taught in Rochester Public 



JULIA M. RAINES 

Associate In Manual Arts 



CORNELIA STRONG, A.B. 

Associate in Mathematics 

Graduate of Agnes Scott College; A. B. Cornell University; one 
year's special work under Prof. Tanner at Cornell ; Instructor in 
Mathematics, Chicora College, Greenville, S. C, and State Normal 
School, Duluth, Minn. 



Page twenty-five 



FACULTY 



MARTHA ELIZABETH WINFIELD 

Associate in English 

Graduate of the State Normal College; Student In Harvard and 

Chicago Universities; Teacher in Trinity School, near Washington, 

N, C, and in St. Paul's School, Beaufort, N. C. 



ANNIE F. PETTY 

Library Methods 

B. S. Guilford College; L. S. Drexel Institute. 



JULIA DAMERON, A.M. 

Associate in Latin 

Graduate State Normal College; A. B. University of N. C. ; A, M. 
Columbia University. 



MARY ROBINSON 

Instructor in Biology 

Graduate State Normal College; Student at Columbia University. 






ELIZABETH B. POTWINE, A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A. B. Mt. Holyoke College; A. M. Columbia University; Principal 
High School, South Windson, Conn.; Instructor in Mathematics, 
Enfield High School, Thompsonville, Conn. 

MYR-A ALDERMAN ALBRIGHT 
Instructor in Piano 

Student at Greensboro College for Women, New York Conservatory 
of Music and Art, Chautauqua, N. Y. ; Taught at Greensboro College 
for Women, Elon College, N. C, and Guilford College, N. C. 



SUSIE MATTIE PURVIS, B.S. 
Instructor in English 

L. I. Peabody College; B. S. Columbia University; Taught in Knox- 
ville High School. 

EMMA KING, A.B. 

Instructor in English 

A. B. Guilford College; Student, Bryn Mawr College; Taught in St. 
Paul s School, Beaufort, and High Point Graded School. 



META SCHMIDT 
Instructor in German 



Student in George Washington University, University of Va., end 
Paris; Taught in Young Ladies Seminary, Washington, D. C, and in 
Friends Select School. 



NETTIE LEETE PARKER 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Graduate State Normal College; Student at Columbia and Chicago 
Universities. 



HARRIETT ELLIOTT, A.M. 

Instructor in History and Economics 

A. B. Hanover College, Hanover, Indiana; Taught in Indiana and 
Illinois; A. M. Columbia University. 

MARY D. TILER 

Instructor in History 

Graduate Milford Preparatory School, Baltimore, Md. ; Student 
Goucher College, Baltimore, Md., and University of Tenn.; Instructor 

in History in Queen's College, Charlotte. 



Page twenty-six 



FACULTY 



MARY BALDWIN MITCHELL, A.B. 
Instructor in Latin 

A. B. State Normal College; Student Cornell University. 

EVA MAY BRYAN, A.M. 

A. B. and A. M. Syracuse University ; Taught in High Schools in 
Henderson, Ky., Palmyra, N. Y., Glens Falls, N. Y., Ithaca, N. Y. 

MARY KING DANIEL, B.S. 

Instructor in English 

Graduate Queen's College, Charlotte; Graduate Teachers' College, 
Columbia University; Taught at Barium Spring's Orphanage, Moores- 
ville Graded School, and Lewisburg Seminary, Lewisburg", W. Va. 

RHODA BAXTER 

Instructor in Physical Culture and Physiology 

Department of Hygiene, Wellesley College. 

EMMA LITTLE 

Instructor in French 

Alliance Francoise; The Sorbonne, University of Paris. 

GERTRUDE SOUSLEY 

Instructor in Piano 

Artists' and Teachers' Diploma, New England Conservatory; Pupil 
of I. Philipp, Paris; Head of Music Department, Meredith College. 



SALLY NEAL 

Instructor in English 

Student at Leache-Wood School, of Norfolk; Taught in Hannah- 
Moore Academy, Md. and in Mai garet College, Ky. 



ELEANORE DIXON ELLIOTT 
Instructor in English 

Graduate State Normal; Taught in Graham and Greensboro High 
Schools. 

ETHEL LEWIS HARRIS 

Instructor in School Music 

Graduate State Normal College; Student in Voice in Boston, Pupil 
of Mi-. Frank Morse; Student in Voice in New York, pupil of John 
Walter Hall ; Institute of Music Pedagogy, Northampton, Mass. ; 
Supervisor in Training School, State Normal College. 



KATHRYN M. SEVERSON 
Instructor in Vocal Music 

Student of Annis Montague Turner, Honolulu; John David Beat, 
Rochester School of Music; John Walter Hall, New York City. 



ALLIENE RICHARD MINOR 

Instructor in Piano 

Graduate of Meredith College. 



ETHEL GARDNER 

Instructor in Piano and Theory 

Graduate Fallten Piano-forte School of Boston; Taught in Fallten 
Piano-forte School, and in Ohio. 



CLARA BOOTH BYRD, A.B. 

Instructor in Commercial Department 
A. B. State Normal College, Student Columbia University. 



Page trventy- seven 



FACULTY 



PATTIE McADAMS 
Instructor in Hygiene 
Graduate State Hospital, Morganton; Presbyterian Hospital, New 
York; Superintendent of Nurses, State Hospital; Nurse, State Nor- 
mal College. 

FRANCES WOMBLE 

High School Inspector 
Graduate of State Normal College; Student at Columbia University. 

ELIZABETH McIVER WEATHERSPOON 

Supervising Teacher of Drawing in Training School 

Student Peace Institute, State Normal College. Teachers' College, 
Columbia University; Taught in City Schools of Greensboro; Super- 
vising Teacher of First Grade Training School. 

ETTA R. SPIER 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

ANNA MEADE MICHAUX 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Student at State Normal College; Taught in Greensboro City Schools; 
Rural Supervisor of Elementary Schools of Forsyth County. 



SUE NASH 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Graduate State Normal College; Taught in Monroe and Goldsboro 
High Schools. 

EUNICE ANDERSON 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Graduate Queen's College; Taught in High Point and Charlotte 
Graded Schools. 



MATTIE E. WILLIAMS 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Graduate State Normal College; Taught in Pomona Graded School 
and Greensboro City Schools. 

ETHEL BROWN 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Graduate State Normal College; Taught in White Oak and Proximity 
Schools, Greensboro, N. C. 



IONE H. DUNN 
Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Graduate of State Normal College. Graduate Work at State Normal 
College; Taught in Durham Graded School. 

RUTH FITZGERALD 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

Graduate of State Normal College. 



JANE SUMMERELL, A.B. 

Supervising Teacher in Training School 

A. B. State Normal College; Taught in North Wilkesboro Graded 
School; Instructor in Latin, Greensboro High School and State Nor- 
mal College. 

R. D W. CONNOR 
Lecturer in North Carolina History 



Page twenty-eight 



, 




A Toast to Our College 

To Her whose spirit shines afar 
From rising sun to evening star, 
To Her who always if she could 
Would make us wise and keep us good, 
We pledge our loyalty. 

To Her who merits all our praise 
For paths of truths through unknown ways, 
To Her who means that womankind 
Shall richer stores of learning find. 
We pledge our loyalty. 



Page /lventy-m'ne 



J 




The College 191 3-' 14 




T is fitting that the first words of The Carolinian be of our College, though they must 
needs describe poorly her growth and development during the past year. To those of us 
who have been here for three or four years, there is evident an inside development that is 
far more significant than improvements on the campus and College farm, or the enlarge- 
ment of class room and dormitory equipment. The sentiment in the community favoring 
student government has seemed to add to the poise and self control of the students. The success with 
which the Senior Class has this year controlled its dormitory life indicates the seriousness and loyalty with 
which the students will assume their new responsibility next year. 

The principal changes in the curriculum during the year have been made in raising the standard of 
the college courses and in eliminating the first division of the two years' course in preparatory work offered 
up to this time. The requirements for entrance to the Freshman Class have been raised two units, — one 
unit being added to the requirement in language and the other in mathematics. 

Probably the most important step the College has taken recently toward fitting her students for the 
practical problems of home life and toward giving them the personal experience demanded of present day 
teachers is the recent establishment of the "Model Home". All students taking courses in Domestic 
Science are given an opportunity to spend some time in this home which is under the supervision of Miss 
Jamison. They plan their meals, order their groceries and supplies, and do their own cooking and house- 
keeping systematically and scientifically. One evening each week they serve dinner to guests. The en- 
tire cost of living — including meals, heat, light, water, etc. — is limited to a certain amount each month. 
Certainly the educational value to any young woman of helping by her own work to make the life in a 
home where the furniture is properly designed and arranged from kitchen to cellar and from bedroom to 
parlor; where the meals are planned and prepared in accordance with the laws of the relative worth of 
foods, — in short where the home is a model one, cannot be fully estimated. 

Another means of giving the students practical efficiency in domestic affairs is the lunch room which 






Page thirty 



has been fitted up in the Training School Building. This room, fully equipped by the College, has, 
during the past year, been under the charge of the Junior Class. Every day simple hot lunches are served 
by the girls themselves to the Training School children and teachers. 

One of the most highly valued addition to our equipment is a splendid pipe organ. The workman- 
ship, finish, and voicing make it one of the best of modern organs. It has added much to the attractive- 
ness of our chapel exercises. 

Among the improvements in the College buildings, the renovation of the Curry building is conspicu- 
ous. It has been transformed into one of the most modern and best equipped buildings for primary and 
grammar grades in North Carolina. Noticeable improvements have also been made in Mclver Building. 
But the greatest addition to the College in the way of buildings has been made in the erection of a new 
dormitory with a capacity of eighty students. The plan is modern and the rooms are ideal in almost every 
respect. 

The erection of an up-to-date barn on the College farm is not to be overlooked. All devices for 
convenience and sanitation are included in the plan of the barn. It houses from fifty to sixty milch cows 
which furnish milk for the College dining room. 

While making these improvements in its own vicinity, the College has also sought to widen the field 
of its usefulness by extension work. Miss Womble, our High School visitor, will be the means of bring- 
ing the College and schools into a closer understanding of their relative needs and requirements. Mr. 
Smith and Misses Jamison, Petty; Long, and Raines, representing their departments in the College, have, 
during the past session, delivered lectures in representative towns of the State under the auspices of the 
Federation of Woman's Clubs of North Carolina. 

These are only a few of the outward indications of the steady and sure progress of the College. 
Back of it all is the support and interest of the Board of Directors, the love and loyalty of an earnest 
student body, and the untiring service of the President and Faculty. These create an atmosphere in 
which the College organization cannot but grow in answer to the need for trained teachers and for strong, 
self-controlled, self-reliant women. 



Page thirty-one 



F 







Page ihirt\)-two 



k 




Page Ihirty-lhree 




THE NEW INFIRMARY 



Page Itdo hundred Itdo 




GOOD ROADS DAY 



Page thirty-five 




NEW DORMITORY 



Page ihirty-six 



Page Ihirty-sevcn 







Coll 



ege Dong 



We raise our voices; let them swell 

In a chorus loud and strong; 
The rolling hills send back the sound 

Of our triumph song. 
For in one great unbroken band 

With ioya! hearts and true, 
Your daughters stand, and hand in hand 

Sing, College dear to you. 



Our college days run swiftly by 

And all too soon we part; 
But in the years that are to come 

Deep graven on each heart 
Our motto, "Service", will remain, 

And service we will do. 
And as we serve, our hearts will turn, 

O College dear, to you. 



Dear Alma Mater, strong and great 

We never shall forget 
The gratitude we owe to you— 

A never-ending debt, 
All honor to your name we give 

And love we pledge anew, 
Unfailing loyalty we bring, 

O College dear, to you. 











SPENCER DORMITORY 



Page ihirl\)-eight 



™ 




GILA 








Senior Class 

Colors : Green and White. Flower : White Rose. 

Moito : 'Immer Treu." 

FALL TERM 

Marguerite Brooks President 

Emma Wilson Vice-President 

Bessie Craven Secretary 

Pearl Temple Treasurer 

Gladys Goodson Critic 

SPRING TERM 

Iris Holt President 

Eliza Moore Vice-President 

Effie Newton Secretary 

Cora John Treasurer 

Sudie Landon Critic 



• ■ ■ ■, ■■ •'.■'i .-■ -/,: m | MHBHV 






Louise Alexander, B.P Charlotte 



N. C. 



ADELPHIAN 



Critic of Class, Fall '1 1 ; Chorus -12-M3,' ;i3-14, Vice-President Athletic Association. 

See that your notes strain not too low. 

This injunction Louise has observed so studiously that it has become a matter of 
habit. Her strenuous alto .s an ever present help, however, in time of tournaments. 
When the class has rooted itself hoarse, Louise remains to cheer the team in victory 
or defeat There is a tradition in the class that Louise never sees the point, but she 
saw plainly enough the necessity of holding us to the hockey field instead of using our 
most valued pnvi ege of sight-seeing off the campus— and her foresight brought 2 the 
championship in hockey tournament. 



COLINE MUNROE AUSTIN, B.P Durham, N. C. 

» 
ADELPHIAN 

Chorus '\2-'\3, *13-'i4, Dramatic Club 'l2-'t3, '13-'I4. 
Trusty, dusky, vivid, true. , 

Coline, in other words— slight, graceful, dainty, and at the same time as dignified 
as you please. You would trust her with your dearest secret, for you know she possesses 
that strange quality known to Senior English as "womanly understanding^' 



■%0 **-~-<s»$Ixr% — ' x £,&.£Im„.-u. 











Effie Baynes, B.S Hurdles Mills, N. C. 



Hockey Team '10, '11, '12, ' 
President Athletic Association 



ADELPHIAN 

13, Basketball '13, Students' Council '12-'I3, 
'13-'14, Dramatic Club '12-'13, '13-M4. 

/'// not budge an inch. 



'13-'14. 



It is always a temptation to wind "Little Erne's" curls around your finger. But 
there's no winding the young lady herself in the same fashion. Truly, she is "set in 
her ways", but let us hasten to add, they are usually the right ways — especially her ways 
of sending the hockey ball toward the goal. 



Louise F. Bell, B.M ■ New Bern, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Editor of Ccrolinian MO-'ll, Vice-President Athletic Association, Spring '12, Orchestra 
MO-MI, M1-M2, M2-M3, M3-M& Dramatic Club *12-*13, M3-M4; Basketball Team 
'11, '12, M3, '14, Hockey Team '10, '11, '12, '13, Assistant Advertising Editor of 
Carolinian M3-M4. 

Panting Time toils after her in vain. 

Of the most indefatigable spirits, Louise is ever ready for a lark, ever ready for a 
laugh, ever ready, too, when 1914 calls for some good hard work — but she is not one 
of those who rush through life. Louise takes her sweet time m this world. Indeed 
only on special occasions does she become "wrought up" and those occasions always 
suit admirably with our own. She is the best listener in time of anger. Truly her 
quick sympathy no less than her care-free spirits has made her very dear to us. 









Sallie Sledge Boddie, B.P Durham, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Secretary of Class '10. 

Behold her breakfasts shine with reputation; 
Her dinners are the wonders of the nation. 

From Sallie's kitchen issue mints, fudge, sandwiches, salads, all the dainties heart 
could desire. Nor have these delights found honor only at the Normal; their fame has 
spread abroad in the land so that their mistress has been chosen to teach the secrets of 
her art at Pomona. Whether through the products of that art — according to the ancient 
legend — or through other avenues, Sallie has found the way to the hearts of all of us. 



Annie E. Bostian, B.P Salisbury, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Editor Magazine '13-'I4. 

Talking she knew not writ; and cared not what. 

Whether you meet Annie bustling from one class to another or in her own room, 
you soon become convinced of the aptness of this quotation. Sometimes, however, she 
can be prevailed upon to leave off talking long enough to listen to the wants of her 
neighbors. 









Marguerite Brooks, A.B. 



<P 



l*Sc~^V.^_j r Ur^ 



*— J^. 



Greensboro, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Secretary of Class, Spring '13, Marshal '13-'14, President of Class, Fall '13. 
Earth's Noblest Thing — A Womanly Woman. 
Marguerite takes her own sweet time in talking and she never wearies of it — at the 
telephone. When we last saw her before our departure for the Christmas holidays, 
she was standing there. Upon our return we found her in the same position. So far 
the class has been unable to decide whether she was standing there again or standing 
there \je/. The only objection to the latter theory is when would she have read her 
morning paper? In addition to the above diversions, Marguerite has successfully 
preserved order at our Saturday night Quaker Meetings for a whole term. 

Maud Bunn, B.P Rocky Mount, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Vice-President of Class, Fall '10, President of Class, Fall '11, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
'12-'13, Dramatic Club '12-'13, '13-T4, House Committee, President Y. W. C. A. 
Her influence vras one thing not to be divided, nor 
discussed, only to be felt with gratitude and joy. 
"Now girls, we just must, you know" — that is Maud in meeting. Who smooths our 
ruffled feathers when we peck at each other for rings or pins? Who pours oil upon 
the troubled waters of a sometimes turbid student government? Who shows us the 
proper spirit, anyway? Why, Maud, of course. Since she happens to be free from 
the labors of Senior Agriculture, she has found time this year to devote hereslf to 
Biology, meanwhile battling vigorously for the cause of Student Government. One 
morning she awoke to find herself the most popular girl in school. How she has 
accomplished all this and at the same time made so splendid a Presiednt for the 
Y. W. C. A. has been a constant marvel to us. 












i^Sjfe*. 









I 



Bessie E. Craven, B.P High Point, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Secretary of Blue Ridge Club '13-'I4, Secretary of Class, Fall '13. 
Immortal bard! thy name shall be enrolled 
Among the first to claim the poet's crown. 
The first poetic production of Bessie's brain was the famous hockey song: 
"The Senior team is high-minded; 
B'lieve to my soul they're double jinted. 
They play ball and don't mind it 
All day long." 
Since then she has been content to rest upon her laurels. Why — we wonder — 
because inspiration has been lacking? because she fears to cloud a fame that cannot 
be brightened? or merely because her aspiration in this direction has been eclipsed by 
her devotion to Senior Agriculture. 



Lalla Lynn Daughety, B.P Kinston, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Entered Class, Fall '13, Dramatic Club '12-'13, '13-'14, Chorus '12-'13, 'I3-'14, 
Class Prophet. 

As a wit, in the very first line. 
If you ever feel gloomy or despondent, seek Lalla, and there is no doubt but that 
she will drive away your dull cares. Arousing the spirits of her companions is not 
the only function of her wit. She can use it to an advantage as a bluff. She is 
decided in her opinions and loyal to her convictions. 














Laura Murphy Faison, A.B Faison, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Member Students' Council 13-14. 
Earth's most envied thing — a woman stylish. 
How we envy Laura Murphy when we gaze upon her laces, ribbons, and frills, 
selected with the utmost taste! We try to find comfort in the belief that we also 
might be stylish, to a certain degree at any rate, if we studied fashion books as much 
as she does. But it is not from a fashion book, we are sure, that she has gained her 
dignity and poise. 



Ruth S. Faison, A.B Fa 



N. C. 



CORNELIAN 



Orchestra 'll- - 12, M2-M3. 

Math thy toil o'er booths consumed the midnight oil? 
Or has it merely caused much worry? Having much faith in the old adage, "early 
to rise", Ruth begins her labor promptly at five o'clock, and throughout the day her 
industry does not lag. Her faithfulness to her work is equalled only by her loyalty to 
her friends. 












( 












Nina Garner, B.P Newport, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Vice-President Athletic Association, Fall 'II, Secretary Class, Spring '12, Hockey 
Team MO, '11, '12, '13, Basketball Team '11, '12, '13, '14, Chorus, M2-'13, '13-'14, 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '13-'14, House Committee Member, Marshal M3-M4. 
The larv : it has honored us; may n>e honor it. 
When a class inaugurates the system of Student Government, that class is sure to 
find, somewhere within its members, certain large and definite shares of that indefinite 
quantity known as conscience. Such an one is Nina. She speaketh the dictates of 
the still, small voice in no still, small manner. 



Gladys Goodson, B.P Marion, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Hockey Team '13, Basketball Team '13, Critic of Class, Fall '13, Picture Editor 
Carolinian '13-14. 

Life holds but laughter, love, and joy. 
Gladys is one of the few of us whose Seniorhood has been unmarred by Training 
School trials, not so much by reason of her care-free disposition, as that her pedagogical 
career was assured by her rich experience as superintendent, faculty, and janitor of the 
celebrated school at Woodlawn. Only when some one fails to keep her appointment to 
meet the photographer does a frown come over her smiling countenance. 
















.- 







Mary Elizabeth Green, A.B Thomas 

ADELPHIAN 

Students' Council jlO-'ll, Hockey Team '10 'II, '12, Basketball Team '10, '11, 
Chorus '12-' 13, 1 3-' 1 4, Joint Winner Murphy History Prize '12-' 13, President Current 
Topics Club '13-'I4, Editor Carolinian 'I3-'14, Marshal '13-'14, Inter-society Debater '13. 
She that l(no1»s ami knows that she IfnoTDs. . . 
Such a one inflicts upon her companions misery that is too deep for words. But 
Mary has a right to know, for she is a confirmed reader of the Literary Digest; and 
do we question her statements, she scornfully remarks that we have not read the latest 
authorities. Thus endeth our knocking, but not hers. . But this knowledge of 

her knowledge has lead her on to great results, for instance, the winning of a History 
prize and high marks on other subjects. 

Pattie J. Groves, B.P Lumberton, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Critic of Class, Spring '11, Students' Council '11-'12, '12-'13, Marshal '12-'13, Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet *12-'I3, '13-' 1 4, Business Manager of Magazine '13-' 14, Inter-society 
Debater '13. 

Tho' modest, on her unembarrassed brotn nature had Tvritten "gentleman". 

Pattie's popularity is partly due to the fact that her readiness to open doors and 
assist one up the steps relieves the monotony of this feminine existence. More than 
that, it is the result of her impetuous enthusiasm in friendship — as well as in class, 
society, athletics, pseudo-politics. However, her energy does not all expend itself in 
mere enthusiasm as the six hundred dollars worth of "ads" for the magazine testify. 

"Patsy" — we love her and we could not transact our business without her, but we 
would be so much more comfortable if she did not take herself quite so seriously. 


















Ruth Pauline Gunter, A.B Sanford, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '1 2-' 13, '13-' 14, President of Class, Spring '13, President of 
German Club, House Committee, Literary Editor of Carolinian '12-'13, '13-'14. 

A little nonsense norv and then 

Is relished by the best of men. 
And is relished by this best of women better than by another one of us. She 
saves us many a wry face, does Ruth; she enables us to smile at many a jest that would 
otherwise be doomed to disaster. And our "most appreciative Senior" has appreciated 
to no less degree the value of her A. B. She has done serious work, and has reaped 
a goodly share of ones. 



Elizabeth D. Hall, B.P Belmont, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Treasurer of Class, Spring '12, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 'I2-'13, Basketball Team '12-'13, 
Hockey Team 12, '13, Picture Editor of Carolinian, M3-'I4. 

Patient to perform. 
If you lack one to make up your hockey team, Elizabeth is ready; if you want 
some one to take kodak pictures, Elizabeth is willing; if you need to rise in the wee 
small hours to translate your Latin, Elizabeth is punctual with her alarm clock; and if 
you are starving, Elizabeth is generous with her blackberry jam. Her geneorlsty, her 
faithfulness, and her never failing kindness have endeared her to us all. 
















I 1 









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Ruth Hampton, B.P Greensboro, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Vice-President of Class, Fall 'II, Art Editor Carolinian '13-'14. 
Ruth has an unusual amount of energy and good nature, — and "Faith, she has 
needed it." From her down town home she has plodded up to the college to attend 
meetings at all unearthly hours of the day and night. Met by the provoking announce- 
ment, Called off or Postponed, she has turned about and plodded home again. And 
never once has she complained at her lot! 



Hallie Wood Holloway, B.P Gorman, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Happy am I, from care I'm free! 
Why aren't they all contented ii£e me? 
Discussions in class meetings of Tree Day, Crave Yard Order, and Senior Privileges 
— these storms that have wreaked such havoc upon the rest of us pass quite harmlessly 
over Hallie. Indeed, she seldom recognizes them as storms until days afterward when 
someone mentions the fact to her. Then she shakes her hair — the only thing about her 
that is ever ruffled — out of her eyes and says with anxious sympathy, "Why, I'm so 



sorry ! 



I" 



P. S. — Lately she has been learning to dance (another ruffle). 








i 






Mamie Agnes Hollow ay, B.P Gorman, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Thou fynoiv'st horv fearless is my trust in thee. 
Mamie trusts not one but all. Her confidence is unshaken, 
rebuff as calmly as if it had never been given, forgiving the offender 



She rises from a 
She is as openly 



friendly as any one we know, ever ready to do a service, whether small or great. 



Iris Leola Holt, B.P Burlington, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Vice-President of Class, Spring '13, Dramatic Club '13-'14, President of Class, Spring '14. 
A face of lily beauty and a form of airy grace. 
Her wealth of golden hair is our constant marvel; her way of lifting her chin and 
declaring, "Girls, we will do it" is our delight; and her sweet lovableness, our inspira- 
tion. For all these reasons and for many more, we have chosen Iris for our President. 








Esther Horn, B.P Mocksville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Historian of Class '12-'13, Chorus 'I2-'13, 'I3-'14. 
She ta^es me prisoner Tvith her tongue. 
jolly, good natured creature, always ready to give advice on any 



Esther is a bi 
subject, from the best design of embroidery to matrimonial affairs, 
her own and she speaks them forth with, or without, an audience 



Elsie Hedley House, B.M. 



H 



er opinions are 



Ma 



i, N. C. 



ADELPHIAN 



Vice-President of Class, Fall '12, Chorus *12-*I3, '13,'H. 

Just the airesl, fairest slip of a thing. 

Nothing ever worries "Son" unduly. When she comes to conflicting paths, about 

which many of us would hesitate with anxious worry, she settles the question with a — 

"My mamma told me to take this one." But whatever path she chooses, we cannot 

imagine her following it contentedly except hand and hand with "Little Thister." 






I 









Lillian Hunt, B.S Oxford, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

/( is not the passing through these learnings that hurts us, but the dwelling in them. 

She begins at the beginning, continues to the end, and yea verily, picks up all that 
is by the wayside. A most diligent collector of facts, and of more facts, is Lillian, 
constant to her tasks, learning everything there is to be learned about them. Furthermore, 
she embarrasses one with her store of information only when she is requested so to do. 



Cora John, B.P Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Hockey Team '11, '12, '13, Critic of Class, Fall '11, Secretary of Athletic Association, 
Spring 13, Treasurer of Class, Spring '14. 

Boldly she knocks at wisdom's inmost gate, 
With Nature counsels, and communes with fate. 
Spiritually Cora has specialized in friendliness and independence; mentally she has 
preferred Chemistry; physically she is the "best all-round girl" in the class. 












y 



Clara Johnston, B.P Greensboro, N. C. 

To babble and to iab\ is not to be endured. 

She tolerates our company to and from the class-room, but beyond that she has 

found our babble not to be endured. She is a town girl, answers every question she 

is asked, and has the habit of taking life seriously. We suspect we should like to 
know her. 



HELEN Jones, B.P Greensboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

'Tis reason's part to govern and to guard the heart. 

Helen's natural aversion for novels and her natural liking for History and poetry 
are two things about her that puzzle us. She makes us feel that the things that mean 
much to us are hardest to get, for it is extremely difficult to exact a judgment from her 
concerning any situation. 









^ 



Louise Jones, B.P Durham, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Treasurer of Class, Fall '12. 

True-hearted, whole-hearied, faithful and loyal. 

Faithful is her pursuit of the labors of Agriculture and North Carolina History; 

loyal is her support of her class, and whole-hearted, her devotion to her friends. In 

them she will permit no fault, nor will she permit another in her presence to admit it. 

In her eyes they are all without blemish, wholly-perfect; and of her they can greatfully 

say "her liking is a blessing; her love, a mantle that would shield from all hurt." 



Audrey Vance Kennette, B.P Mooresville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Treasurer of Class of '15, Fall '12, Basketball Team 'II, '12, '13, '14, Entered Class, 
Fall '13. 

My hair is Ufce the red, red rose. 

When "Red" presented herself as an addition to our class last Fall, we welcomed 
her with enthusiasm and the chairmanship of our Entertainment Committee. For although 
we had seen her merely as the little Sophomore with the red curls, who indulged much 
in laughter and Hershey's, we had heard rumors of her ingenuity as a planner of 
straw rides and flower dances. Yet with all her fame not the slightest hint had reached 
us of her facility as a writer of excuses. 







, 




Sudie Landon, B.P Clinton, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Critic of Class, Spring '14. 
The glass of fashion and the mould of form. 
Do we want to see the latest Parisian style, we immediately search for Sudie and 
examine the dress she has on. We never fear but that if we follow her example we 
will be most stylishly clothed. She, however, is not over-confident, but spends consider- 
able time in worrying over this as well as the other tribulations of life. 



Edith Lineberger, B.P Belmont, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Moderator of Class "12-1 3, Chorus '12-' 13. 
Unto the ground she cast her modest ejie, 
And ever and anon Tvith rosy red. 
The bashful blush her snoTvy cheeks did dye. 
Whether her blushes arise from bashfulness, or from over-exertion in the Training 
School, we can hardly say, but we suspect that both these causes are responsible. The 
compliments she has received for her success with "her boys" may easily account for the 
blushes that so frequently are her only replies. 



MatTIE LlPE Mooresville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Moderator of Class, Fall *I3, Chorus 'I2-'J3, *13-'I4. 

IVhat's he that interrupts our quiet sorrow? 

We hated to do it, but more than once we have found it necessary to disturb 

Mattie's sober ruminations. Indeed, The District School would have been impossible 

except for Mattie "Patient to perform," she is faithful in all and to all, nor when 

weighed in the balance is she ever found wanting 



Elizabeth Webb Long, B.P Fair View, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Students* Council '13-*14. 

Daughter of the gods, divinely tall 

And most divinely fair. 

Elizabeth's reserve and indifference quite as effectively repulse our friendly advances 

as the habitual "no ad" on her door does our visits. There are two things, however, 

that it has been impossible for her to bar us from appreciating — her face and her voice. 




' 







Emma Lossen, B.P , Wilmington, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Whenever thou didst tool? on me 
/ thought of merry birds. 

Emma is possessed of a miraculous power (o imitate everything from the mocking 
bird's latest variation to the newest figure in Senior gymnastics. Drawing and whistling 
are Emma's accomplishments, the latter of which makes her so attractive as to render 
well nigh unavailing her roommate's plea for order in the halls. Lately, too, Emma 
has been dictating the fashion of wearing gloves and hat to gym. 



Belle Lupton, B.P Belhaven, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

President o' St. Mary's Guild, Fall '13, Vice-President of Current Topics Club '13-' 14, 
Treasurer of German Club '13-*14. 

That continuous sweetness, which with ease 

Pleases all round it, from the wish to please. 

Belle has her own opinions and does not hesitate to express them; yet she manages 
to do it in such a way that no one, not even she with the notable chip on her shoulder, 
could possibly be offended. Her frankness has won our liking and has made her room a 
place of popularity. 



Mattie McKinney, A.B. Reidsville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Entered Class Fall 13. 
'Tis curiosity — who halh not fell 
lis power and before its altar knelt? 
Through her curiosity, Mattie learns many things that the rest of us would like to 
know. The acquisition of these facts has added spice to the patient, constant work she 
has done in college. Through all this, she has remained unruffled, apparently never 
having lost her temper even once. 



May McQueen, B.P Morven, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Orchestra 'lO-'ll, 'II-T2, T2-T3, T3-'14, Secretary of Class, Fall 12, Editor-in-Chief 
of Magazine '1 3-' 14, Class Poet. 

There is a pleasure in poetic pains 

That none hut poets J^now. 
Our poet presides with equal grace over the Library and the Magazine. Though 
she soars in the realm of poetry, she never roams from the practical domain of house- 
keeping; thus, we conclude that she is verily a type of the wise. But she possesses 
one small bit of property that the class has been unable to reconcile with the quality 
of her wisdom. We have puzzled much over their incongruity, and have at last decided 
to put no faith in the ring, voting its owner, in spite of specious proof to the contrary, 
a fore-ordained old maid. 





- 



Lila Melvin, B.S White Oak, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Secretary Students' Council '12-M3, Editor Magazine '12-'13, Cabinet Y. W. C. A. 
, 12-'13, Chorus *12-'13, '13*14, Vice-President Y. W. C. A. '13**14. 

Let nature be your teacher. 

A true disciple of Wordsworth, the Nature Poet, in that she finds beauty where 
there is no beauty. As Wordsworth in his frequent wanderings found the celandine 
and called it "beautiful", so Lila in her frequent walks around Observation Hill, finds 
rag weeds and calls them "delightful". When she is not engaged in the weed-studying 
process, she busies herself in arguing, or in writing poetry for the magazine. 



Fannie Starr Mitchell, A.B Wilmington, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Treasurer of Class, Fall *10, Hockey Team 'lO-'ll, Secretary and Treasurer of German 
Club 'II-M2, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '12-*13, Marshal '12-13, Dramatic Club '12-1 3. 
'13-M4, President of Latin Club M3-T4, Historian of Class. 

And n>e turn from all our woes 

To coust the twirls of Mitchell's toes. 
At least, that is true at the eighth period on Wednesday afternoons; loathed melan- 
choly, herself, would smile to see Fannie Starr's innocent delight in doing the Scottish 
Reel. But we face another proposition when she takes charge of Senior Latin; all our 
woes return then with a vengeance. For be it known that Fannie Starr scored no less 
than a 1 on that Latin, to say nothing of sundry courses in Math, and German and 
the like. 









Eliza Moore. B.P Greenville, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Vice-President of Class, Spring '14. 
Her voice was ever soft, gentle and low; an excellent thing in woman. 
Avaricious our class is, for though we have sixty-seven members we still want Moore. 
Fastidious we are, also, for nothing Moore in the world will fill our need except — just 
Eliza. For none other would be, at once, so quiet, so womanly, and so well-poised. 



Mary Eleanor Morgan Goldsbc 



N. C. 



CORNELIAN 



Students' Council * 1 0- "11, '11-'12, Marshal '12-'13, Assistant Editor-in-Chief of 
Magazine '13-'14, Chorus "12-'I3, 'I3-'14, Joint Winner Murphy History Prize '13. 
Inter-society Debater '13. 

And wearing all that weight of learning 

Lightly, lilfe a flower. 
A little slip of a thing with red-brown hair — that's the Eleanor we see. A woman 
of letters, a debater, a champion of students' rights, a winner of History Prizes — that's 
the Eleanor we marvel at. A bounteous giver of sympathy and understanding — that's 
the Eleanor we love. 























. 



Jeanette Musgrove, B.P Weldon, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '13-' 1 4, Marshal '1 3-' 1 4, House Committee. 

/ heard her complain 

You have walked me too soon; 

J must slumber again. 

Yet we felt rather flattered when Jean was called the "typical Senior". Indeed 
we would gladly believe her dignity, her good looks, and her unfailingly pleasant manner 
typical of us, but we draw the line when it comes to her propensity for social blunders. 



Effie Johnson Newton, B.P Hope Mills, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Secretary of Class, Spring '14. 

She takes to Math, and poetry; 
She has peculiar tastes. 

A product of the sand hills. Her toil over Latin has been wonderful, but her 
consecration to Math, is unbelievable. If one could imagine any one's arising at five 
A. M. daily for four years in pursuit of conic sections or Infinitesimal Differentials, one 
must have in mind such a one as Effie. Yet the most incrdeible thing of all is that 
along with her devotion to the science of how much and how many, she has all the 
poets at her tongue's end — particularly John Charles McNeil. 















Daisy Pinner, B.P Canton, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Entered the Class, Fall '13, House Committee. 
Light be thy heart! Why shouldst thou keep 
Sadness within its secret cells? 
We call her a Lutheran and aptly, for she advocates three reformations: a physical 
reform, resulting in a reduction of her own weight; a political reform, abolishing study 
from the school platform; and a social reform, making it unnecessary for newspaper 
men to spend their evenings at work. She does not contemplate a spiritual reformation, 
for her cheerful heart and happy spirits need none 



Rochelle Pippin, A.B Wakefield, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

President of French Club '13-'14. 
Attempt the end, and never stand to doubt; 
Nothing's so hard, but search will find it out. 
Apparently Rochelle enjoys the search, for she is constantly at it. Her regular 
school work is performed diligently and cheerfully. Her conversation in leisure mo- 
ments is chiefly concerned with Latin theses, French constructions, and Browning's poetry. 
Her recreation is spent in teaching Algebra to a private pupil. We often wonder if 
Rochelle will put aside her books long enough to receive her diploma at Commencement. 

















»-yV-*.n.r->-*<»-*-* — 



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Lillian Reeves, B.P Mt. Airy, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Hockey Team '10, 'II, '12, '13, Basketball Team '11, '12, '13, Chorus '12-'13, 'I3-'14. 
Entered class, Fall of '13. 

With mirth and laughter, let sorrows vanish! 
"Lilly"' so often deprives us of the pleasure of her presence in the evenings that 
we hardly feel competent to dissect her character. We would gladly impose that 
task upon a certain member of the medical profession, or for that matter, upon any 
of the other four of her frequent visitors. We can say this much, however, that on her 
way to and from the parlor she is always generous with her candy and her jolly laugh. 



Alice Robbins, B.P Lenoir, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Marshal '12-' 1 3. 

Never hurried, never idle, busy from morning till night at all sorts of tasks from 

Persius to hem-stitching, she rivals the famous bee for industry and the legendary pin 

for neatness. Yet like the ancient Cato, she is never too busy to devote her service to 

whatever is at hand. A half conceived wish, and Alice is lugging home your stock of 

books, and has vanished and reappeared with mucilage or opera coat, whatever you 
need at the moment; indeed the words we associate with Alice are "Let me.' 



1 






Irene Robbins, B.P Lenoir, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Treasurer of Class, Spring 'I I, Editor of Carolinian "12-'13, President of Class, Fail 12, 
Winner of Walker North Carolina History Prize '13. 

A clerfc there was of Oxenford also 
That unto logyfy hadde lon§e \}-go. 
The novelties of Freshman life, the happy-go-lucky charms of Sophomore days, 
the all-absorbing outside TDor\ of the Junior year,— no — not even the countless dis- 
tractions of Seniorhood have wooed Irene from her devotion to learning, 
"For hym was levere have at his beddes heed, 
Twenty bookes clad in blak or reed 
Of Aristotle and his philosophic 
Than robes riche, or fithele, or gay sautrie." 






Fannie B. Robertson, A.B Rowland, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Historian of Class, Spring '12, Athletic Vice-President, Fall '13, Marshal '13-'14. 

Shall I not lo\e mine ease in mine inn? 

Fannie B. has an A. & M. sweater, an A. & M. pennant, an A. & M. pillow, 

an A. & M. picture, and an A. & M. table cover. She has a bip heart and a 

friendly smile. And above all she has a good easy time. 







■■ 







KATHERINE ROCKETT, B.P Randleman, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Then may I plunge at last into the crowd, 
Where revel calls and laughter ever loud. 

This desire for society has been carefully concealed from her classmates for lo 
these many yeai;, and has only become known now when it is about to be realized. 
Katherine is quite competent to become a belle, for she is skilled in language and 
art. Her German is her pride; the private art gallery, which she has in her closet, 
her exceeding delight. 



Annie V. Scott, B.S Greensboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '12-' 13, Assistant Magazine Editor '13-'14 

Nor doubt nor fear thy steadfast faith can move. 

It is just as difficult to quicken her actions as it is to move her faith. Although 

she is slow in her movements, she thinks promptly and accurately. She is a ready 

authority upon scientific investigation and present day topics, for she is a thorough student 

of all the sciences our curriculum affords, and a diligent reader of Current Opinion. 















Sarah Perrin Shuford, B.S Newton, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Secretary of Miscellany, Fall '12, Secretary of Students' Council '13, Magazine Editor 
'12-'13, Dramatic Club , I2-'13, '13-'14, Marshal "13-'14, Editor-in-Chief Carolinian. 

All the windy ways of men 

Are but dust that rises up 

And is lightly laid again. 
We have strolled with her in burning sun, we have loitered with her in the pouring 
rain, we have lingered with her in the freezing cold, we have even walked with her 
to breakfast, but we have never walked with her to Expression. Then — why then we 
assume a slightly less lingering pace. 

When the Seniors venture forth behind the footlights, she leads the way heroically; 
when the Seniors tempt the realm of letters, she champions their cause — you see how 
successfully. The magazine found her indispensable, and without her the Annual 
could not have been. And through it all she has kept the even tenor of her way. 



Margaret N. Smith, B.P Goldsboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Vice-President Athletic Association, Spring 'II, President of Class, Spring '11, Chorus 
•|2-'13, 13-14, Dramatic Club , 12- - 13, '13-'14, Basketball 'II, '12, '13, '14, Hockey 
Team '10, '11, '12, 1 1 3, Tennis Champion '13, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet '12-'I3, Adver- 
tising Editor Carolinian '13-'14, Writer of Last Will and Testament. 

"Smith" is always in the game. Now she's our queen of hearts whose charms 
none of us can quite resist; now in the twinkle of an eye, she's merely a joiner — 
indispensable in hours of despondency. But always and everywhere she is a trump 
with which we win high stakes — athletic cups, diamatic fame, artistic pre-eminence, 
literary renown. Sometimes, we must admit, she is more of a bluff than anything else. 



S 





r 

















Margaret Case Sparger, A.B. . . . 

ADELPHIAN 

Basketball Team '11, '13, '14, Hockey Team '10. 

Treasurer Athletic Association '13-14. Entered Class Fall of 12. 

So teasing! So pleasing! 

And full of all mischief, J Tueen ! 
Margaret is full of unconquerable energy, wholesome wit 
which one would never suspect from such a serious countenance 
highest pitch during the hockey game. Her ability to knock ... 
direction is excelled only by her ability to give characteristic "knocks" to the rest of u 



. Mt. Airy, N. C. 
12, '13, Critic Class Spring '13, 



and mischievous fun, 

Her energy is at the 

that ball in the right 



Bertha Alice Stanbury, B.P. . . 

ADELPHIAN 
Entered Class, Fall '13. Member of Chorus '12-'13 



Be 



N. C. 



Treasurer of Y. W. C. 
'12-'13, '13-'14. 



A. 



13-M4 

12-'I3, Literary Editor Carolinian '13-M4, Scrub Faculty 
Ml; Math, is but the iomh 
Of joys long past. 
Our "synonym for Algebra" would perhaps question or deny this statement, for 
Math, seems to be a joy to her, but we are writing fiom the standpoint of her pupils, 
some three score Preps. And if, as Dr. Foust says, Mathematical students are especially 
accurate, then we don't wonder that her report boasts of all ones and twos. 






k. 



Hazel Stevens, A.B Greensboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit. 

The most convincing proof of Hazel's quietness and modesty is the fact tha* the 
could not stand the noise and boisterousness of dormitory life, but was compelled to 
seek refuge in the shelter of her home. This may also account for the good work she 
has done. 



Willie May Stratford, B.P Charlotte, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Critic of Class, Fall '12, Assistant Business Manager of Magazine M2-M3, Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet '13-14, Basketball Team 'II, '12, '13, '14, Hockey Team Ml, M2, M3, Debater 
Fall M2, Chief Marshal M3-M4; President of Students Council M3-M4, President of 
Current Topics Club, Spring M4. 

A life on civic action bent, 
A potent voice in Parliament 

With "Bill" a thing is no sooner thought than said, no sooner said than done — 
both by herself and others. She has been called "our suffragette." Her independence, 
her authoritative manner, her untiring efforts to arouse Senior Hall with her stiring 
battle song, The Rosary — all these are evidences of the appropriateness of the title, 
and might well justify us even in prefixing "militant." 














Pearl Temple, B.P Sanford, N. C. 



ADELPHIAN 



'13. 



Chorus 'I2-'I3, 'I3-'14, Treasurer of Class, Fa 

How poor are ihe\) who have not patience! 

Then passing rich is Pearl. For she possesses patience to wait for the basketball 
to come her way, patience even to wait for class fees to come to her — resting secure in 
the knowledge that all things come to her who waits. Yet, she manages quietly to 
accomplish a deal of work while she waits. And she goes about that work with a 
demeanor that is dignified as befits a Senior, and gentle as befits Pearl. 



Bessie Terry, B.P Rockingham, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Treasurer of Class, Spring '13, Assistant Business Manager of Carolinian '13- 14, 
Chorus '12-'13, l'3-'14, Hockey Team, '12-'13, '13-'14, House Committee Member, 
Fall '13. 

It's a bad idea for a man to change. 

"Madame President, we just can't afford to give up 'tree day' now since we've 
planned for it. And besides, Senior classes always have 'tree days'. ' 

"Madame Chairman, I hope we won't decide to leave all the stories out of the 
Annual. They had ever so many in, last year. 

"Girls, we just must be careful about keeping order during study hour. We've done 
fine so far and we ought not to grow lax now." 

That's Bessie — at class meeting, at Annual meeting, on the halls . 



"Sy 






^ 



Winifred Norfleet Turlington Clinton, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Entered Class, Fall '13. Athletic Vice-President, Fall 'II, Spring '13, Hockey Team 
'10, '11, '12, '13, Basketball Team II, 12, '13, M4, Champion Tennis Team, Spring 
"13, House Committee, Business Manager of Carolinian '13-* 1 4. 
The keen spirit seizes prompi occasion. 
This business manager of ours is a most amazing young woman. Do you want a 
champion tennis player, a hockey player, at whose sight opposing teams quake and 
tremble, or a goalman from whose hands the ball goes straight into the basket — then 
call for Miss Turlington. But this is not the limit of her accomplishments ; she is 
equally skillful in clog dancing and hopping on street cars. 



Nola Wagstaff, B.P Roxboro, N. C. 



CORNELIAN 
Vice-President of Class of '15, Fall *12, Hockey 



12, Basketball Team *I3. 



Team 
Entered Class of '14, Fall '13. 

This rocfe shall /?jj 
From its firm base as soon as I. 
This is a most striking characteristic of Nola. Once she has made up her mind to 
do a thing, she can be stopped only by main force, and rarely by that. The only 
thing that completely routs Nola is the sight or sound of a mouse. Between her 
attacks of fright at sight of mice, she manages to put in a good amount of studying— 
at least her grades would lead us to think so. 





















Agnes Viola Warren, B.P Dunn, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Chorus 'I2-'13. 'i3-*l4, Secretary and Treasurer of Current Topics Club, Fall 13. 
No love is Ufce a sister's love 
Unselfish, free, and pure* 
We doubt if even the gay life that Agnes leads in Senior Hall can fill the void 
occasioned by the absence of Sister Emma, than whom no other is more dear to Sister 
Agnes. Still she does not spend much time brooding over this separation, but lavishes 
smiles and friendly words on all with whom she comes in contact. 



Anne Eliza Watkins, A.B Sanford, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Hockey Team '11, Moderator of Class, Fall 11, Secretary of Athletic Association, 
Fall '12, Chorus '12-'13, *13-'14, Vice-President Athletic Association, Spring '14, 
Literary Editor Carolinian '14. 

Ease in your mien, and siveetness in your face. 
Anne has two salient points. The first is her ability to surpass the most marvelous 
tale yet told, whether it be snake tale, fish story, accident, or precocity of youthful 
relatives, for haven't "the twins" or some of the rest of her numerous cousins had 
more striking experiences than that! The other is her quite cheerfulness, which 
nothing short of First Grade teaching in the Training School or Annual work has 
ever disturbed. 












. 






Pauline B. White, A.B Greensboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Industrious habits in her bosom reign. 
Pauline's favorite occupations — cooking and sewing, varied with a little Sabbath 
School teaching — have been sadly interrupted this year by the necessity of her seeing 
that everyone in the class is properly supplied with Senior sweaters and stationery. We 
were sorry to interfere with her domestic and religious endeavors but we just could not 
excuse her from the committee work. 



Clara Whitley Smithfield, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

We know very little about Clara except that she lives upstairs "in the corner room" 
and that she passes to and from this abiding place with the quiet dignity that befits a 
Senior. The frequent sound of an alarm clock comes to us early in the morning from 
the direction of her room and leads us to classify her with the "early risers." 











-rvw<k»>xn>-t* 



Emma Wilson, B.P Winston-Salem, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Hockey Team '10, '12, '13, Dramatic Club 'I2-'13, 13-14, Vice-President of Class. 
Fall '13. 

All the spirit deeply damning in the darl^ of hazel eyes. 

She who is beautiful and knows it not is wonderful. And our dainty, dark-eyed 
little Emma is indeed one of those rare creatures who know not their own prettiness, 
therefore we adore her. Moreover she has adorned herself with another jewel not 
unbecoming in woman; namely, that of constancy. Constancy carried to perfection is 
her devotion to "Smith". 



Annie May Woodside, B.P Southport, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Lilfe clocks, one wheel another one must drive; 
Aflairs by diligent labour thrive. 

One of those creatures who realize that things are accomplished not by putting them 
off till to-morrow, but by doing each one in turn. She even believes that the sleep 
that can be gained to-day should not be deferred till to-morrow. The only exception 
to this rule in her whole life, so far as we know, is her learning to spell. 



Senior Class Song 



O dear class, we pledge to thee 
Faith and Truth and Loyalty, 
For right and honor we will stand 
As we journey hand and hand; 
"Immer Treu" our motto be 
Always faithful lo thee. 



And through all the coming years 
We will conquer all our fears, 
We will strive with all our might 
To gain fame for Green and White 
To bring honor and bring joy 
1914 "Immer Treu". 



And when at last we reach the end, 
And our ways we onward wend, 
We'll remember with delight 
Thee, dear class of Green and White. 
For we've found in "Immer Treu" 
Present love and future joy. 



Page seventy-seven 




Registry of Deeds 




September 20, '10. 
■J&%^3% EAR Chum: 

Why on earth didn't you tell me that something like this would come to 
pass? There I was, enjoying life at home, even if it was as "a big frog 
in a small pond", and here I am now — at this awful place, being trampled 
underfoot by all! You haven't experienced it; so you can't sympathize. 
But I can tell you that it's no joke, after having been a High School Senior last year, 
to "come down to earth" this way; it's quite a new and unwelcome experience to look 
around and see others in the positions of High-and-Mighty,, in-favor-with-the-Faculty 
Seniors, while we poor "newishes" have to step aside for them to pass, and smile grate- 
fully if they even cast a glimpse at us. And it's not only the Seniors, but even the 
Sophs, who act so stuck-up and superior, and scare us to death ! I guess we'll survive — 
I hope we shall! — but oh! please pity us homesick, hard-worked, much-abused Fresh- 
men, and hope that times will soon change for the better, and the noses of those Sophs 
come down to earth again, and life be made more bearable. 

October 28. 

ONE HUNDRED FORTY-ONE"— don't you think that's a pretty good number 
for one young class to claim? I didn't realize until we organized last week how 
numerous we Freshies are, nor what a great and wonderful thing a class-meeting is — 
where you have to address "Madam President" before you can say a single word, and 
where you review your French Grammar by deciding, after much discussion, whether 
"between us" is translated "entre nous" or "entre vous". 

Our class motto is "Immer Treu" — "Always faithful". Isn't that beautiful? And 
every one of us means to live up to it, too ! 



Page seventy-eight 



December 5. 

DID you ever get up early, and trample through the 
frosty leaves in the woods, to learn class songs and 
yells? If you haven't, you can't know how much fun it is, 
nor how "swell" you feel when showing off your accomplish- 
ment along that line at Hockey Tournament, — even if 
your hopes are blasted a little later, as ours were. For those 
little insignificant Preps walked over us in the very first 
game — and when we had been so confident of victory ! 
That was the finishing touch of all ! 

December 22. 

JUST time for a note to-night, to tell you about our class- 
tree — for we really have one of those things now ! We 
adopted it to-night, and it's a beauty — a little maple, just 
behind the Library. We have it decorated now with a 
large green-and-white bow. You should have seen how 
surprised all the girls were when they found it out. If I 
do say it as I shouldn't, I think we've shown folks we could 
do something, if only keep a secret! 

January 15, 191 1. 

HAVE you ever visited Fairyland? I guess we have 
the advantage over you there; for those same little 
Sophs whom we called "stuck-up" last fall, gave us the 
key that admitted us to the Land of the Japanese Fairies, 
where about seventy-five gayly attired little Japs flitted 
about, making everything merry for us. 



January 27. 

MID-TERM exams have just come and gone like a 
plague, carrying away several of our good members. 
It makes us feel blue just to think of those we've lost, but 
I guess we'll have to reconcile ourselves with the thought 
that sustained us through the first homesick days last fall — 
"we'll survive, somehow". 



April 25. 
UESS what? Basket-ball Tournament has come and 
gone, and again we've lost — and to those Preps. 
again ! We would like to settle with them just once, and 
let them know we're not to be trifled with ! 



G 



September 22, 1911. 

I REMEMBER a homesick note I wrote you upon ar- 
rival here last fall. If you could just know how dif- 
ferent it is this year, seeing all our old friends, and meet- 
ing the "Babies". Really, it is fine to be "old girls", and 
have the youngsters sit up and take notice! Not but about 
sixty of us " 1 9 1 4-ers" are back, but we mean to amount 
to something this year, and show folks we can be useful as 
well as ornamental. To begin with we are planning to give 
a Tacky Party real soon, to make money for — oh, well! 
you know all classes need a little money now and then! 



Page seventy-nine 



November 30. 

WE have won a cup! It may come as a shock to you 
— it did to us, I know. But when we entered the 
"Mock Field Day" games on Thanksgiving we got so ex- 
cited that we lost our heads and won — the tin cup! Oh, 
you needn't laugh! "Nineteen Hundred and Fourteen" 
scratched on that cup with a pin will seem just as big to 
us as " 1 9-something else" may seem to others. And we 
don't mean to let it be the only ' 1 4 engraved on athletic 
cups up here, either ! 

December 1 2. 

WE'VE been rising early and stealing over to Curry 
Building and down to the "gym" lately, to practice 
a little Indian play and war-dance. Well, the time which 
we were planning for came at last, when a few nights ago 
the Freshman Pale-faces met us — sturdy, copper-colored 
Indian braves and gayly-attired squaws, in "Curry Forest"; 
there we entertained them with the stunts we have been 
practicing. 

February 30, 1912. 

WE had hoped to celebrate our little tree's first birth- 
day before going home Christmas, but it seems that 
whenever rain is desired, the best thing to do is to let our 
class plan a stunt! So the delayed birthday party has just 
come off. After the exercises around the tree, we all went 



to Curry Building, our old haunt, where the "boys" of 
the class found their partners by matching cards. Then a 
half-dozen gathered around each chafing-dish, where they 
found that they had over-rated their own ability, for though 
each had thought herself an expert in the line of candy- 
making, that candy simply refused to cook properly. I 
dare say that if we had waited until now, it would still be 
calmly simmering away there ; but at last we despaired, and 
ate the sticky stuff just as it was. It's a wonder it didn't 
kill us. There's still time for that though, I guess. 

We've gained the dearest little fellow in the world as 
our class mascot — Master Alphonso Calhoun Avery. We 
have been looking forward to the time when we could see 
him, and our wish was realized yesterday, when the little 
chap was brought up to see us, on the very first visit he 
has ever made to anyone. You may know how proud we 
are of him! 

May 17. 

SUCH a stir as we're all in, for to-morrow our pageant 
comes off — the same pageant that we've been planning 
and working for, for over a year! Folks have been coming 
in galore — old girls and strangers. I don't believe the old 
Normal has ever seen such crowds before. And to-morrow 
it will rest with us to uphold the Normal's name. But 
we'll do it, or die in the attempt — just you wait and see ! 



Page eighty 



December I, 1912. 

1 GUESS I've a perfectly good right now to say "I told 
you so", for didn't I say we would make good in ath- 
letics? This year, Hockey Tournament found us all ready 
to challenge even our ancient enemies — and what is more 
to the point, to be victorious! We really won! We're 
still pinching ourselves to see if we are really awake, or are 
just dreaming the whole thing. However, that ' I 4 on the 
Bell Trophy Cup seems more substantial than any dream 
could ever be ! 

We've just come through another battle, of another 
sort, too, — a rather domestic affair, I expect you might 
call it, for the whole thing pertained only to our class. It 
was caused by a traveling-agent presenting himself at our 
abode, and saying he would like to show his wares to our 
class. That was sufficient! It took only two minutes for 
the armies to be drawn up in battle-array — the one side 
holding aloft a pin, and their adversaries bearing as their 
symbol a ring. The contest waged thick and hot until, 
just before the dinner-bell rang, the "rings" had conquered 
a sufficient number of the "pins" to enable the former to 
carry the day. Amid the cheers of the victorious you 
could hear just one little heart-rending sob — "My finger 
just wasn't made to wear a ring"! 



March 7, '13. 

THE gladdest, merriest time of all the year" passed 
off duly last night, according to invitations to the 
Seniors to be our guests for "dinner and the theatre, on 
the evening of March 6th". As you have never been up 
here during an affair of the sort, you can't even begin to 
appreciate it — but if you were here you would wish you 
might escape so full an appreciation of it, — what with hav- 
ing all your best togs borrowed, not to mention your as- 
sistance rendered in buttoning, pinning, and arranging! 
At last we were all off — each Junior triumphantly escorting 
to the car-line her pick of the whole Senior class, between 
two lines of open-mouthed, admiring under-classmen, and 
remembering with scorn the time when she herself formed 
part of the crowd that "sped the parting guests". Well, in 
our opinion the whole affair went off "iligintly", and if 
the guests enjoyed the entertainment half as much as the 
hostesses enjoyed the guests, — why, that is all we could 
ask for ! 

April 30. 

IT surely makes a body feel that her dreams are really 
coming true, to be "drawing straws" — or rather, slips, 
for her room in Senior Dormitory next year. But when she 
realizes that several slips are blank, owing to the fact that 
the capacity of her future home is insufficient to meet the 



Page eighty-one 




demands of her class, — she feels anxious, to say the least! 
She draws a long breath, and then a slip! She is success- 
ful — or otherwise — methinks you might judge "which 
from her countenance ! 

September 18, '13. 

HERE we are back again, all 69 of us, being pointed 
out to new girls as "the ones", being greeted most 
effusively by all our old chums, and being granted the heads 
of the tables without question, even in these days of "sit- 
where-you-please". Hard work is ahead of most of us — 
all that talk of "resting on your laurels" during your Senior 
year is just talk and nothing more, — but right now, before 
work begins, it surely is pleasant to try it for awhile. All 
of us are really packed into Senior Dormitory, though how 
it was done is a mystery; and now we are all living happy 
in the thoughts of being together again, and of Senior priv- 
ileges to come. We have a long list already prepared to 
petition for, in hope to get enough granted to bear us 
through the year. 

October 10. 

WOULDN'T you like to take a meal with me at my 
table? — For I really have one of my own, now. 
Tables were arranged last week, and now to see us "Play- 
like Seniors", as we seem to ourselves, presiding over the 
coffee-pots, you might imagine we had always been ac- 



customed to bearing the dignity of the position. Really, 
we did try the "dignity scheme" for a day or two, but 
alas! instead of creating awe and respect, it called forth 
only laughter; so that now we are just ourselves again. 



De 



nber 5. 



JUST one word more about athletics. To-day on the 
Hockey Field we added one more trophy to our list of 
spoils, which, counting in the 1913 Tennis and Field-Day 
Cups, makes five to our credit! Our "mother class" of 
1910 urged us to keep up their basket-ball record, and 
though we haven't so far been successful along that line, 
I think they'll agree that we've done our best, and will be 
satisfied with our line of work. 

January 7. 

NINETEEN HUNDRED FOURTEEN"— our 
year — here at last. We've been waiting for it, and 
working for it, and longing for it for so long that the fact 
that it is really here is unbelievable. Just one more small 
four-months, and we will be leaving our four-year's home, 
to seek new homes next winter, and try to accomplish 
something by means of all the knowledge and energy and 
enthusiasm we have in store. 

We've been looking into the future lately, and, upon 
seeing all the problems waiting for our solving, have de- 
cided to prepare ourselves by tackling some of them now. 



Page eighl\)-two 




As a result, we have put our brains to work on such subjects 
as Darwin's Theory of Evolution, The Negro Problem, 
Social Welfare, and the like. And the more we have 
studied, the more we have been forced to 

"Look at the end of work, contrast 
The petty done, the undone vast". 

February 7. 

THIS morning invitations arrived for us from 1915, — 
attractive little cards, inviting us to spent St. Valen- 
tine's evening with them. Of course we are all delighted, 
and are now dividing our time between planning what to 
wear, and being c'onsumed with curiosity to know just how 
it will all be. 



Feb 



ruary 



12. 



COMMENCEMENT — the realization of all our hopes 
— the time when our dreams will come true, — will 
really be with us before we know it. And then we'll be 
happy in the knowledge that we've won out, and sad in the 
thought that we're to part from those we've loved for four 
long years. But our happiness will triumph for we'll 
realize that now we are ready to meet the world, and 
help solve the problems ; that there is a place for us out 
in the world, and that we are ready to find it ; and that in 
future years we'll all gather here again, at our dear old 
Normal, and renew our present love and joy. 




Page eighly-thrce 




Senior Class Poem 



Dear Class of Nineteen Fourteen, 
We would pledge our love aright 

To thy motto, "Immer Treu", 

And thy colors, Green and White. 



And this toil has bound together 
All our hearts with love to thee; 

For that love we're paid full measure 

By the strength we've gained from thee. 



Four long years we've worked together, 
Four years striven for the right, 

For our motto, "Ever Faithful", 

And our colors, Green and White. 



To you tender Foster Mother, 
We would give the tribute due 

For thy guardian care and training 
By a loyal love and true. 



As thy magic word has taught us, 
Willing service we will do; 

Thus we'll link our kindred motto, 
Ever Faithful, ever true. 

— May McQueen. 



Page eighty-four 




V/BiTFRTAil 

JUNIOR 

Colors: Red and White. Flower: Red Carnation. 

Mollo: "Ich Kann". 

Officers 
fall term 

Gertrude Carraway President 

Mabel Cooper Vice-President 

Annie Albricht Secretary 

Alice Sawyer Treasurer 

Gay Holman Critic 

SPRING TERM 

Vonnie McLean President 

Hilda Mann Vice-President 

Cora Sloan Secretary 

Vera Millsaps Treasurer 

Mamie Eaton Cn,,c 




Page eighty-five 




Junior Class 




ANNIE ALBRIGHT 
Waynesville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Secretary of Class, Fall 13. 
Her life is full of laughter 



EDITH AVERY 
Morgantown, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Student Council '11 -'12, Class His- 
torian '13, Annual Editor '13-' 14, 
Inter-Society Debater '13-' 14, 
Marshal '13-'14, Dramatic Club 
'14-M5. 

And lo! Ben Adhem's 
name led all the rest! 

GLADYS AVERY 

Morgantown, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Dramatic Club '14-' 1 5, Cabinet of 
Young Women's Christian Associ- 
ation '13-' 1 4. 

Learned and witty, 
jovial and gay. 

HALLIE BEAVERS 

Siler City, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Secretary of Class, Fall '12, Vice- 
President of Athletic Association, 
Fall 13, Cabinet Young Women's 
Christian Association '13-' 14. 
Few things are impossible 
to diligence and sfyill. 



JULIA BRYAN 

Battleboro, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Vice-President of Athletic Associ- 
ation '12-'13, Champion Basket- 
ball Team. 

There is a woman — hut 
'tis before her face; I 
will be silent. 



KATE BULLARD 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

Constant in that she tal?cs in hand. 



JULIA CANADAY 
Benson, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Magazine Editor '1 3-' 1 4. 
7Yue ease in writing comes 
from art, not chance. 



GERTRUDE CARRAWAY 

New Bern, N. C. 
CORNELIAN 

President of Class '13-'14 (Fall 
Term), Dramatic Club 'I3-'I4. 

A head to contrive and 

a hand to execute. 




L 



Page eighty-six 



JUNIOR CLASS 




ERNESTINE CHERRY 
Scotland Neck, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

She hath the voice of hon- 
est praise to follow her. 



MABEL COOPER 

Taylorsville, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Vice-President Class, Fall '1 3-' 14. 

She'll drive dull care away. 



MARTHA DECKER 

Marion, N. C. 
CORNELIAN 

In queenly dignity. 



MAMIE EATON 
Garland, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Class Critic, Spring '14. 
/ laugh, for hope hath a 
happy place with me. 



LILLIAN ELLIS 
Wilson, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Every duty well performc 



KATHERINE ERWIN 
Brevard, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Students' Council '11-'12, '12-'13, 
Dramatic Club '12-' 13, '13-' 14, 
Secretary of Y. W. C. A. '13-'14, 
Marshal '1 3-' 1 4, Champion Basket- 
ball Team. 

My heart is true as steel. 



RUTH GAITHER 

Harmony, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Music the fiercest grief can charm. 



LENA GLENN 

Stoneville, N. C. 
ADELPHIAN 

Hail to thee blithe spirit! 




Page eighty-seven 



r^ 




JUNIOR CLASS 




EDITH HAIGHT 
Rocky Mount, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Vice-President of Athletic Associ- 
ation 'II -'1 2 (Spring), Annual 
Editor *I2-'13, Treasurer of Ath- 
letic Association '12-'13, Dramatic 
Club - 12- , 13, '14-'15, Treasurer of 
Y. W. C. A. 'I3-'14, Magazine 
Editor '13-'14, Champion Basket- 
ball Team. 

Humor's daughter — mixing 

wit with wisdom. 

RUTH HARRIS 
Fayetteville, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Vice-President of Students' Coun- 
cil '13-'14, Students' Council '12- 
'13. 

All good and gentle 
graces meet in her. 



GAY HOLMAN 
Wilkesboro, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Critic of the Class, Fall '13. 

A good hecrt's worth gold. 



FLORENCE HUGHES 

(Near Junior) 

Greensboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Students' Council Member 'I3-'I4. 
So much good so truly tried. 



HELEN HUNT 
Oxford, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Where music dwells. 



MAZIE KIRKPATRICK 
Clyde, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Class Secretary, Fall Term 'I I -'12, 
President of Blue Ridge Club '13- 
'14, Member of Dramatic Club 

M2-'13, •13-14. 

As merry as the day is long. 

HILDAH MANN 

Swan Quarter, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Vice-President of Class, Spring 

'14, Dramatic Club '14-' 15. 

She doeih little kindnesses 

which most leave undone 

or despise. 



VONNIE McLEAN 

Democrat, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Critic of Class, Soring *12-*I3, 

President of Class, Spring "14. 

Rich in saving common sense. 




Page eighty-eight 



. 



JUNIOR CLASS 




VERA MILLSAPS 

Statesville, N. C. 
CORNELIAN 

Treasurer of Class, Spring Term 
•13--I4. 

When night has set her 
silver lamp on high, then 
is the time for study. 



BERTHEL MITCHELL 
Asheville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Sludents' Council 'I3-'14. 
Industry can do anything 
genius can do. 



MAMIE MORGAN 
Fairview, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Who jvorlgs best her 
simplest duty heeds. 



SUSIE RANKIN 

Gaslonia, N. C. 
ADELPH1AN 

Her air, her manners, 
all rvho san>, admired. 



ALICE SAWYER 

Wilmington, N. C. 
ADELPHIAN 

Treasurer of the Class, Fall 
Smooth runs the water 
where the broofy is deep. 



•13. 



PAULINE SHAVER 
Salisbury, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Champion Basketball Team, Ath- 
letic Vice-President, Spring Term 
'I3-'I4. 

A prodigal of smiles. 



MERRILL SHELTON 

Canton, N. C. 
ADELPHIAN 

Nothing great was ever 
achieved without her en- 
thusiasm. 

• S s tT 

CORA BELLE SLOAN 
Hendersonville, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

Class Secretary, Spring Term, '13- 

'14. 

Deeds, not words. 




Page eighty-nine 



r7^ 




JUNIOR CLASS 




JANEY STACEY 
Reidsville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

The practical woman counts. 



LYNETTE SWAIN 
Mebane, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

She's a jolly, good fellow. 



ETHEL THOMAS 

(Near Junior) 

(Lenoir, N. C. 

Vice-President Class, Spring '13, 

Annual Editor 13-14, Historian 

of Class T3-'I4. 

She decides on the right 
— and slices to it. 



ETHEL WELLS 
Greensboro, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 
Champion Basketball Team, Class 
Secretary, Spring '13-14. 

/ charge thee, . . . 

fling away ambition. 



MILDRED WHITE 

Mebane, N. C. 
ADELPHIAN 

Thy modesty is a 
candle to thy merit. 



LOUISE WHITLEY 

Albemarle, N. C. 
CORNELIAN 
Vice-President Athletic Associa- 
tion 'II -'12, Champion Tennis 
Team '10-'ll, Champion Basket- 
ball Team '13, President of Class, 
Fall 'I2-'13, Marshal '13-'14, Dra- 
matic Club '12-'13, '13-'14, Cab- 
inet of Y. W. C. A. '13-'I4. 

Not to fynow her argues 

yourself unknown. 

MARGARET WILLIS 

Mount Airy, N. C. 
CORNELIAN 

Class Treasurer, Spring Term 
12-13. 

Who mixed reason with 
pleasure and wisdom with 
mirth. 



MARY WILSON 
Archdale, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 

Wisely worldly but 
not worldly wise. 




Page ninety 



JUNIOR CLASS 





MARY WORTH 
Wilmington, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 
Critic of Class Fall 11, Secretary 
of Y. W. C. A. '12- - 13, Class 
President, Spring 13, Member of 
Cabinet of Y. W. C. A. T3- - I4, 
Marshal 'I3-M4. 

Those about her from her 
shall learn the perfect 
may of honor. 



BESSIE WRIGHT 
Salisbury, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 

She's a friend of us all. 



ROSELLE DITMORE 

(Near Junior) 

Millsaps, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 



INEZ HONR1NE 

(Near Junior) 
Wilson's Mills, N. C. 

ADELPHIAN 



CAREY WILSON 

(Near Junior) 

Mooresville, N. C. 

CORNELIAN 




Page ninety- one 




Newspaper Clippings from the Fall of 1911 to Spring of 1914 



NORMAL CLASS HAS 

AUSPICIOUS OPENING 



Sept. 18, 1911.— The State Normal Col- 
lege opened to-day with six hundred students. 
Of this number approximately one hundred 
twenty-five are Freshmen. Prospects are 
bright for one of the most favorable and 
prosperous years in the history of the College. 
— Greensboro Evening Journal. 



FRESHMAN CLASS ORGANIZES! 



Oct. 6, 191 1. — To-day wa3 a red-letter 
day at the State Normal College; the or- 
ganization of the Freshman Class was ef- 
fected. Efficient officers were elected for the 
coming term, Jessie Gainey being made Pres- 
ident. The class bids fair to be the be- 
ginning of a new era in College History, it 
having the largest enrollment of any class 
since the founding of the College. — Creens- 
boro Evening Journal. 



UNDERCLASSMEN MAKE GOOD! 



FRESHMEN DISTINGUISH THEMSELVES ON THE 
HOCKEY FIELD. 



Nov. 28, 1911. — Perhaps the best game of 
the Hockey Tournament at the Normal this 
year was played to-day, when the Freshmen, 
who had won in every previous game in 
which they had taken part, played the Jun- 
iors. The work done by the Freshmen was 
brilliant for under-classmen, though the cup 
was won by the opposing team. The play- 
ing of Haight and Kluttz was especially 
noticeable for players new to the game. The 
future of the class in athletics bids fair to be 
distinguished if not always successful. — 
Greensboro Evening Journal. 



SOPHS ENTERTAIN FRESHMEN ! 



DELIGHTFUL ENTERTAINMENT GIVEN BY 
SECOND-YEAR GIRLS TO NEW GIRLS. 



Dec. 5, 191 1. — Saturday was a time of 
much merriment when the "heap big" Soph- 



omores asked the "pale face" Freshmen to 
partake of their hospitality. The Curry chapel 
was the hunting-ground. Here, in the woods 
dotted with wigwams, the guests heard the 
tale of Hiawatha told again, saw the laugh- 
ing Minnehaha, besides witnessing an Indian 
dance and hearing quaint Indian songs. The 
refreshments, however, were of distinctly mod- 
ern type. The hours sped by all too swiftly, 
and only of necessity did the entertained bid 
the entertainers farewell, after an unusually 
pleasant evening. — Greensboro Daily Star. 



MARKED ORIGINALITY! 



FRESHMEN AT THE STATE NORMAL PLANT 
FLOWER GARDEN INSTEAD OF CUS- 
TOMARY TREE. 



April 9, 191 2. — For some time the other 
students at the Normal have been wondering 
just when the present "Class of 1915" would 
plant their tree, and what new exercises would 
be used. What wa3 their surprise to learn 
that this morning the girls, wearing their col- 
ors, with white suits and red hats, had silently 



Page ninety two 




NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS FROM THE FALL OF 1911 TO SPRING OF 1914 



left the dormitories, gone to the grounds north 
of the Infirmary and calmly adopted a flower 
garden to be the recipient of their care and 
love and labor instead of the usual tree. This 
is something unique in the history of the Col- 
lege, and shows an effort on the part, even 
of under-classmen, to sacrifice class for Col- 
lege Spirit.— Greensboro Daily Star. 



NORMAL STARTS WORK AGAIN. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS IS CREATLY DIMINISHED. 



Sept. 20, 191 2. — The Normal girls re- 
assembled to-day from all parts of the State 
for another years work. Much enthusiasm is 
manifested by the students over the prospects 
of the year ahead. One startling thing has 
been noticed by the old students, — the great 
diminishing in numbers of the new Sopho- 
more Class. From the one hundred twenty- 
six Freshmen of last year, there are but forty- 
eight Sophomores so far this fall. 



"FUNNY-PAPER FAIR". 



UNIQUE ENTERTAINMENT GIVEN BY SOPHO- 
MORE CLASS AT THE NORMAL. 

Nov. 29, 1912. — Something unusual in the 
line of stunts was given by the Sophomore 
Class at the Normal last night, when all the 
characters of the popular comic supplements 
held sway in the Gym. The Katzenjammer 
Kids, Snookums, even Mult and Jeff, — all 
were reveling together in high glee. The af- 
fair was ususual, to say the least. While 
perhaps not a decided financial success, it 
created plenty of amusement for those attend- 
ing, and gave the Sophomores a "fair" repu- 
tation. ^Greens boro Evening Journal. 



CLASS OF '15 UPHOLDS LAST 

YEAR'S ATHLETIC RECORD 



HOCKEY TOURNAMENT CLOSES AT NORMAL. 



Dec. 6, 1912. — Last year's story was re- 
peated on the Hockey Field to-day at the 
Normal, when the Junior team won the cup 



o.er the "Class of '15". It will be remem- 
bered that the latter team made a record of 
distinction last year when it played last year's 
Juniors in the final game. Again the team 
proved an honor to the clas3, and again we 
predict for them future glory.— -Greensboro 
Daily Star. 



ANNUAL SOPHOMORE- 
FRESHMAN ENTERTAINMENT 



Dec. 20, 1912. — The event of the year, 
in the eyes of the Freshmen — the entertain- 
ment given by the Sophomores in their honor 
— is to come off Saturday night before the 
students depart for the holidays. The Sopho- 
mores, who call themselves the "Flower 
Class", have decided to carry out this idea 
in their entertaining. The Curry chapel will 
be decorated as the Court of the Queen of 
the Red Carnation. Here this Queen will 
sit in judgment over all the flowers to see 
which shall take her place as Queen, since 
her right has been disputed. Perhaps it would 
not be a wild guess to make, were we to say 



Page Jiinety-three 




NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS FROM THE FALL OF 1911 TO SPRING OF 1914 



that the Violet may be crowned. Refresh- 
ments will be served, and the evening con- 
cluded by an aesthetic dance given by the 
Flowers. The Sophomores are laboring faith- 
fully to make the evening a success. — Greens- 
boro Star. 



SOPHS GIVE AN EGG-HUNT! 



PLAN FAILS TO BRING DESIRED RESULT. 



March 1 I, 1913. — In a mad desire to 
obtain that share of the elusive coin which 
they felt to be their lot, the class of Sopho- 
mores, on Monday afternoon, determined to 
give an egg-hunt — something new and original 
in the annals of the College. The day ar- 
rived, but with it torrents of rain. Nothing 
daunted, however, they postponed the plan, to 
resume it the next day. No showers pre- 
vented it then. The eggs were hid in a 
portion of the park, and an admittance fee 
charged for entrance to the search. But the 
much-hoped-for dazzling results were lacking. 
An exact number of those entering is not 
given. It is hoped the "wise young Sopho- 



mores" made expenses on the adventure. But 
whether they did or not, — it is fynoivn that 
they gained in wisdom if not in gold. — 

Greensboro Evening Journal. 



SOPHOMORES WIN CUP! 



UNUSUALLY GOOD GAME PLAYED. — BASKET- 
BALL TOURNAMENT CLOSES TO-DAY. 



April 7, 1913. — Great interest was shown 
to-day when in the final game of basketball 
the Sophomores were the winners of the 
trophy cup. The game was close and all 
credit is given to the valiant opponents. It 
is hoped, however, that to-day's victory will 
not "turn the heads" of the victors of '15 
who are already slightly egotistical over a 
distinguished record in athletics. — Greensboro 
Daily Star. 



IMPROVEMENTS ARE MADE IN 
FLOWER GARDEN BY CLASS OF '15 



Sept. 25, 1913. — The Juniors have made 
some striking improvements in the looks of 



their garden. About the summer house they 
have planted both red and white rambler 
roses. The section reserved for roses alone is 
already half-filled, and more will be planted 
soon. In another part sweet peas are planted 
which will bloom for next Commencement. 
But perhaps what has given mo3t pleasure is 
the plot of dahlias and chrysanthemums which 
have bloomed so profusely and which the 
Juniors have given away so lavishly, both to 
the Faculty and to the different class Presi- 
dents. The walks and beds of the garden are 
surrounded with violets. Many, other than 
Juniors, have derived pleasure from their 
garden this year. — Greensboro Daily Star. 



JUNIORS GIVE "TRIP 

AROUND THE WORLD"! 



FATE OF THE VOYAGE. 

Nov. 28, 1913. — Last evening the good 
ship "See All" set out from the Harbor of 
"Spencer" and started on a voyage "Around 
the World," stopping at America, Holland, 
Africa, and Japan. At each port they were 



Page ninety-four 



-T— 




NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS FROM THE FALL OF 1911 TO SPRING OF 1914 



entertained by natives in true native style. 
The noble crew struggled hard to make the 
trip a success, but the recent fate of the 
Titanic seemed to terrify everyone at even 
the prospects of such a voyage so that only a 
few of the more adventurous sallied forth. 
These report a fair voyage, but add that 
there's truth in the adage — "the more the 
merrier." — Greensboro Morning Post, 



SAD AFFAIR AT THE NORMAL! 



DEFEAT OF OVER-CONFIDENT JUNIORS ! — 

CRUSHED FURTHER BY ATTITUDE 

OF THE SOPHS. 



Dec. 16, 1913. — The great suffering of the 
Juniors caused by the loss of their dearest 
ambition, the Bell Trophy Cup, produced 
great distress among that class to-day, when 
the decision of the final game went to the 
Seniors. The defeat was unusually sad, and 
there was great lamentation among the losers. 
The general gloom was deepened by the atti- 



tude of the present Sophomore class who, 
almost in a body, rooted loudly for the Sen- 
iors. The Sophomores having always been 
favorites of the Red and White girls, this 
act on their part tended to crush the Juniors 
more deeply than ever. The defeated team 
stood the shock bravely, however, and, show- 
ing the true spirit of a loser, invited the vic- 
torious girls of *14 to dine with them that 
evening. The invitation was gladly accepted ; 
and in the good cheer that followed, all old 
scores were forgotten. — Greensboro Evening 
Journal. 



JUNIORS MAP OUT WORK 

FOR COMING YEAR 



ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING HELD. 



April 15, 1914. — An important and inter- 
esting meeting was held yesterday by the 
"near-Senior" class at which a summary of the 



present year's work was given and plans for 
the future discussed. Among the things 
already accomplished were the carrying out of 
the Junior-Senior reception, despite the fact 
that it was postponed; the selection of a 
class ring instead of a pin, — the ring having 
the class symbol upon it; the wearing of these 
rings for the first time at the flower garden 
exercises in April; and the success made of 
the Lunch Counter. But these were things of 
the past. As to the future, this is indeed a 
class with "greatness thrust upon it.* 1 To 
their lot falls the carrying out of Student Gov- 
ernment, the biggest undertaking by the stu- 
dents in the history of the College. The burden 
of this, and the result — whether it is a suc- 
cess or not — rests in large measure on the 
present Junior class. 

To them also falls the success or failure of 
the National Pageant to be given at their 
Commencement. Surely the name of the class 
of 1915 will go down in history! — Greens- 
boro Morning Post. 

— Ethel G, Thomas, 75, Historian. 



Page ninety -five 




Sophomore Class 



Class Colors: Lavender and White. 

Our Motto : "Try 

Officers 
fall term 

Flora Garrett President 

Kate Mae Streetman Vice-President 

Lucy Hatch Secretary 

Annie Beam Treasurer 

Rosa Blakeney Critic 



Class Flower: Violet. 



SPRING TERM 



Anna Docgett 
Eunice Dauchety 
Jay McIver . . 
Deluke Pinkston 
Mary Gwynn . 



. President 

Vice-President 

. Secretary 

Treasurer 

. Critic 



Page ninety-six 



History of the Sophomore Class 




OW that we have reached the hill of Sophomore-hood, we like to look back to our childhood days and from 
our present elevation view with complacent mind the interesting events in our career since we occupied the 
Vale of Humility. 

We look back even to the day we approached this institution of learning, the Normal College, feeling, 
after our recent graduation from High School, quite learned folk indeed. What a stir we felt we would 
make in the intellectual world of this College! Let us pass over the painful period of disillusionment that followed. That 
we might brace ourselves for traversing college-dom, we formed ourselves into the class of Nineteen Sixteen. While yet 
young in college life, we were invited to the little hill where the Sophomores lived. A merry time we had there among the 
flowers. Our feelings were not so jubilant when we tried our luck on the hockey field and — but when did ever a Fresh- 
man class get the hockey cup? 

Last fall we were allowed to let the banner of Nineteen Sixteen fly over Sophomore hill. We have found upon 
inhabiting it that it is even higher and of more importance than we formerly thought. One fine night last fall, it was our 
privilege and pleasure to take our Freshmen neighbors to eat marshmallows and apples and watch gypsies dance by the light 
of campfire and jack o' lantern But one gloomy day last fall, we again saw the ruin of our hopes when the hockey cup 
went to a sister class — it is not customary for the Sophomore class to win the hockey cup. 

We have, from our present location, a splendid view of the high hill occupied by the Juniors. That elevation is very, 
very near us, but not so high as to tower above Mount Senior which lifts itself in awe-inspiring majesty above us all. We 
have fond dreams of climbing that Delectable Mountain some day and unfurling there the Lavender and White banner. 
We have dreams too of the things we will accomplish as we make our gradual ascent — dreams whose realization will 
bring honor to our Alma Mater and to the class of Nineteen Sixteen — it is the custom of Sophomores to dream dreams. 

— Daisy Hendley, '16. 



Page ninety-seven 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Page ninety-eight 




Hail thou dear class of 1916, 
Our all we pledge to thee; 

To win the glory here we bring 
Love, honor, and loyalty — 



Sophomore Class Roll 

Tempe Boddie 

Annie Ree Humbert 

Ruth Albright Eva Lucas 

Annie Beam Arey Lipe 

Julia Holt Black Alberta Monroe 

Margaret Boseman Florence Hughes 



And hand in hand, a loyal band. 
We'll hear thy clarion, "Try," 

We'll fight our fight and \ictory i 
Then float our banner high. 



Cora Caudle 
Jeannette Cox 
Elizabeth Craddock 
Fannie Darlington 
Eunice Dauchety 
Roselle Ditmore 
Anna Doccett 
Mary Dorrity 

Sidney Dowty 

Flora Garrett 

Annie T. Glenn 
Louise Goodwin 
Mary Gwynn 

Sarah Gwynn 

Margaret Harper 
Daisy Hendley 



Lynette Swain 
Ruth B. Tate 
Lillian Wakefield 
Belle Walters 
Evelyn Whitty 
Marguerite Wiley 
Carey Wilson 



Our college days are fleeting fa3t, 
'Neath la v ender and white; 

Then let us strive, true worth to 
And make her fair name bright. 



prove. 



Claire Hendley 

Inez Honrine Rebecca Stimson 

Lucy Hatch Rosa Stacy 

Kate Mae Streetman 

Amelia Sweet 



Janie Ipoch 
Octavia Jordan 

Nannie Lambert 
Margaret Linker 

Edwina Lovelace 

Sadie McBrayer 

Jay McIver 
Esther Mitchell 
Narva O'Daniel 
Lillian Parrish 
Margaret Petrie 
Bessie Pinkston 
DeLuke Pinkston 
Naomi Pool 
Mary B. Powell 
Caroline Robinson 
Annie Spainhour 

Unbroken still, the ties of love 
That bind our hearts as one, 

We'll serve thee through the coming years 
Until our race is won. 



Pag,; n.'/ie/Ji-m'nc 



' 



Fresk 




a,ss 



Freshman Class Officers 

FIRST HALF 

Catherine Lapsley President 

Genevieve Moore Vice-President 

Carrie Goforth Secretary 

Juanita McDougald Treasurer 

Pauline Williams Critic 

LAST HALF 

Ruth Kernodle President 

Irene Myatt Vice-President 

Ruth Roth Secretary 

Flossie Harris • Treasurer 

Madge Kennette Critic 



We're the class of 1917, 
A group of students true; 
We're working all together 
Right -valiantly to do. 
We'll be courageous ever 
With cheerful hearts endeavor, 
Our motto "Persevere" our song 
To guide our path along. 



Freshman Class Song 

Dear class of 1917, 
Our hearts will turn to thee, 
With love and reverence ever, 
When we must severed be. 
As we wander far apart 
May each carry in her heart 
Ideals that will ever be 
Worthy, class, of thee. 



Oh class of 1917, 

As we forward press, 

Life's race is all before us 

Ere the goal, success. 

Not unmindful of the end 

May we our moments wisely spend. 

To our colors always true, 

To our steadfast White and Blue. 



Page one hundred 




History of the Freshman Class 

PS^M N the year 1913 the State Normal College sent out a call for reinforcements and we, the 
,^J/ present Freshman class, answered it by enlisting in that great army about two hundred 
^~\ so 'd' ers rr °m all parts of the country. We have vague memories of the ancient days in 
V<^l High School when we were eager to begin the long and hard struggle. During those 
days of military training we listened eagerly to all words concerning lieutenants, captains, 
majors, generals, commanders-in-chief and other such officers of rank in the regular army. How we stood 
in awe of them ! With what relief we listened to the words of a visiting officer from the army and learned 
that they were human beings like ourselves! 

Although we had thought ourselves very well versed in military tactics, when we arrived at the army 
headquarters, we found ourselves to be raw recruits, trained only in the roughest kind of barbarian warfare. 
This of course meant that we had a long, hard struggle before us, if we were to come out as victors. 

The first step toward real military service was taken when we chose our captain, Catherine Lapsley. 
Not many were the encouragements offered us in our campaign, but one which will always be remembered 
with the greatest delight, was the "gypsy camp supper", given us by a sister company, the Sophomore 
class. This proved a great incentive for greater achievements and made us hope that we too might some 
day help a struggling company. Under the standaid, Blue and White, which had been left us by the 
troop of 1913, and with our motto "Persevere," we entered the hockey tournament, the first great contest 
of this period. But let us not dwell upon this, our first defeat. 

The second great struggle was with a more powerful enemy, Mid-term Examinations! But having 
gained strength by the daily practice imposed by our several commanders, we were enabled to come out 
as victors in the fray. Counting our losses, we found that only twenty-three soldiers had been lost on the field 
of battle. This conquest marks the beginning of a new era in which we chose a new captain, Ruth Kernodle. 

And now after our warfare in this land we have come really to be mustered into service. The 
battles we have fought, the hardships and struggles which we have endured — these have drawn us closer 
together. And now we look forward to the noise of battle, the glory of conquest, and the song of the 
conqueror, which will be 191 7's in the days to come. 



Page one hundred one 









FRESHMAN CLASS 



Page one hundred too 



Freshman Class Roll 



Pattie Benton 
May Louise Fallon 



Joy Briggs 
Ruth Blythe 
Frances Abbitt 
Purcelle Adams 
Laura Anderson 
Maude Bagwell 
Annie W. Baldwin 
Mary E. Barwick 
Winifred Beckwith 
Rosa Blakeney 
Margaret Blythe 
Isabel Bouldin 
Cornelia Brady 
Belle Bullock 
Catherine Burns 
Bessie Cameron 
Lois Campbell 
Eliza Capehart 



Ethel Davis 
Julia Davis 
Lucy Davis 
Esther Covington 
Hattie Covington 
Olivera Cox 
Grace Crumpler 
Annie Daniel 



Ellen Carson 
Anna Cavenaugh 
Hattie Coates 
Eva Coletrane 
Sallie Connor 
Mary Cooper 
Vesta Council 



Alice Hall 
Fountain Hamilton 
Helen Harrell 
Flossie Harris 
Mary N. Hartman 
Fannie Hatch 
Frances Hendren 



Mabel Henchen 

Fannie Higgins 

Julia Hodgin 

Pearl Hogan 

Ellen Holms 

Laura Holt 

Katherine FIoskins 

Frankie Howard 
Louise Howell 
Maggie S. Howell 

Dorothy Hunt 
Marcaret John 
Katherine Johnson 
Hallie Jones 
Kate Jones 
Louise L. Jones 
Ruth Jones 



Estelle Dillon 
Maude Duncan 
Gladys Emerson 
Elizabeth Evans 
Martha Fields 
Annie May Fuller 

Mary Fisher 
Rebecca Fleming 
Annie Folger 
Sue Fountain 
Sadie Fristor 



Naomi Joplin 
Ruth Joplin 
Eva Keeter 
Ernestine Kennette 
Madge Kennette 
lorena kernodle 
Ruth Kernodle 



Della Garren 
Carrie Goforth 
Mary Gordon 
Annie Graeber 
Emily Gray 
Jessie Groome 



Pcge one hundred three 







FRESHMAN CLASS ROLL 

Eva Moore 

Lucinda Martin 

Isabelle McAllister 



Grace Lucas 
Annie Lucas 
Flossie Kersey 
Addie Kluttz 
Catherine Lapsley 
Hallie Legcett 
Marie LeRoy 
Marie Linebercer 
Mabel Lippard 



Martha Loftin 
Minnie Long 
Maysel Lupton 
Ava L. Lyon 
Mattie McArthur 

JUANITA McDoUGALD 

Margaret McIver Etta Schiffman 
Louise Maddrey Imogen Scott 
Elizabeth Macemore Pearl Seagraves 



Margaret Mathews 
Ethel Munroe 
Genevieve Moore 
Josephine Moore 
Frances Morris 
Lillian Morris 
Kate Morrison 



Elsie Sparger 
Flossie Siler 
Ada Smith 
Euline Smith 
Gertrude Smith 
Lucy Smithwick 
Edith Smoak 



Marguerite Sherrill 
Nancy Stacy 
Flossie Stout 
Norma Styson 
Frances Summerell 
Mabel Swanson 
Texie Swink 
Maude Tate 
Brownie Taylor 
Sallie Teal 
Thelma Temple 
Irene Templeton 
Annie Tennent 
Hattie Thigpen 
Frances Tull 
Eugenia Watson 
Ouida Watson 
Christian West 
Grace Lee White 



Lila Owen 
Irene Myatt 
Lennie Neal 
Marie Norwood 
Eula Parrish 
Sadie Patton 
Isabel Payler 
Vivian Payler 
Annie Pearson 
Lottie Perry 
Acnes Petrie 
Alice Poole 
Mary Poteat 
Clara Powell 



Hope Watson 
Nettie White 
Marie Whitehurst 
Bessie Whitson 
Alice V. Williams 
Pauline Williams 
Estelle Wilson 
Verd Wilson 
Annie Winkler 
Lois Wooten 
Eddie Younge 



Kate Pridgen 
Artelee Puett 
Juanita Puett 
Julia Rand 
Ruth Reid 
Marianne Richard 
Miriam Robertson 

VlRGIE RODWELL 

Elizabeth Rogers 
Ellen Rose 
Ruth Roth 






Page one hundred four 



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COMMERCIALS 



Page one hundred five 




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Young Women's Christian Association 



To awaken one and all 
To the great clarion call: 
"To serve the best is duly." 

To bring into each one 

A joy in duty done, 

To make each task seem noble. 

Yea, e'en to set the goal 
For heart and strength and soul: 
"To strive like Him to be" — 

To serve in every way 
To live in every day 
To be a moving force. 

— Edith C. Avery. 



Page 



hu.v 










CABINET OF YOUNG WOMEN S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



Page one hundred ten 



Y. W. C A. 



Officers 

Maud Bunn President 

Lila Melvin Vice-President 

Kathleen Erwin Secretary 

Edith Haicht Treasurer 

Miss Jane T. Miller General Secretary 



Chairmen of Committees 



Ruth Gunter . . 

Catherine Lapsley . 
Willie May Stratford 
Mary Worth . 
Nina Garner 



Devotional 

. Music 

Membership 

Missionary 

Bible Study 



Gladys Avery . . 
Louise Whitley . 
Pattie Groves . . 
Annie Spainhour . 
Frances Summerell 
Hattie Coats . 



Association Nevis 

Social 

Finance 

Social Service 

Calendar 

Leader of Volunteer Band 



Mazie Kirkpatrick President of Blue Ridge Club 

Faculty Advisory Board 

Mr. R. A. Merritt 

Miss Mary King Daniel 

Miss Laura H. Coit 



Page one hundred eleven 




THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 



Page one hundred twelve 



S.. 



1 



Hattie Coats 



The Student Volunteer Band 

Pledge : "It is my purpose if God permits, to become a foreign missionary.' 

Officers 

Leader Addie Klutz 

Mazie Kirkpatrick Secreian; and Treasurer 



Assistant Leader 



Members 



Miss Laura Coit 
Miss Jane Summerell 
Annie V. Scott, '14 
Florence Hughes, '15 
Mazie Kirkpatrick, '15 
Hattie Coats, '16 



Cora Caudle, '16 
Addie Klutz, '16 
Sidney Dowty, '16 
Tamsy Hill, '17 
Arey Lipe, '16 
Ava Lee Lyon, '17 



Some Facts About the Band 

Organized 1912. Former students in field, twenty; former students in preparation, six. 
largest college membership in the North Carolina Student Volunteer Union. 



Tho 



Page one hundred thirteen 







BLUE RIDCE CLUB 



Page one hundred fourteen 




Page one hundred fifteen 





The Cornelian and Adelphian Societies 

fiflSZT B HE Cornelian and Adelphian Literary Societies are the only secret organizations in our 
College. Unlike sororities, they have no fixed requirements for members, but admit any 
student who desires to become a member. In order to prevent undue rivalry between the 
two Societies an equal division of the new students each year is made by a joint committee. 
The influence of these two Societies is felt throughout the College as a potent factor in 
literary and intellectual development, in cultivation of love for music and art, and in raising the social 
standard. 

In much of their work the Societies co-operate. They have joined in presenting the O. Henry Loving 
Cup as an annual prize for the best short story submitted by any High School girl in the State. They 
have also united in organizing the College Dramatic Club, composed of fifteen members from each Society. 
At every Commencement this club presents some play in honor of the visiting alumnae and the other guests 
of the College. 

Another form of co-operative work is the publication of The State Normal Magazine. The editorial 
staff of this magazine consists of four members from the Cornelian and four from the Adelphian Society, 
the editor-in-chief and business manager alternating between the two. This staff, with the aid of an Advis- 
ory Board from the Faculty issues eight copies annually. 

The spirit of co-operation between the Societies, shown by this work done together, is accompanied 
by a feeling of wholesome rivalry kept up by the annual inter-society debate and short story contest. 



Page one hundred sixteen 



^ 




ADELPHIAN SOCIETY HALL 



Page one hundred nineteen 




ADELPHIAN SOCIETY COMMITTEE ROOM 



Page one hundred twenty 



is . 



Adelphian Song 



Shoulder to shoulder, hearts rilled with devotion. 
With purpose not aimless, but earnest and true, 

United by all of the ties of deep friendship, 
We bring, O Adelphai, our homage to you. 

We pledge to you loyalty, long and unending. 
Loyalty which will be firm, will be sure 

Devotion we pledge you which never can perish 

And love which through all coming time will endure. 



In all that we do we will never forget you, 

Each member will strive to gain honor, gain fame, 

Not merely to satisfy selfish ambitions, 

But to add honor to your beloved name. 

Ever before us to point toward the highest, 
Ever beside us to lead toward the right, 

You, in the years now dim in the distance 

Will be, O Adelphai, our clear guiding light. 



With courage undaunted, we'll march ever onward 
Up heights to be won; along paths strange and new. 

But, now and forever, one great band of sisters, 
We'll be, O Adelphai, still loyal to you. 



Page one hundred twenty-one 




ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 






°aPe one hundred iTventy-two 



Adelphian Literary Society 



Frances Abbit 
Martha Alexander 
Katherine Allen 
Ruth Albricht 
Louise Alexander 
Laura Anderson 
Elsie Anderson 
Grace Arrington 
Ruth Arey 
Ethel Ardrey 
Gladys Ashworth 
Coline Austin 
Edith Avery 
Gladys Avery 
Ola Avent 
Maude Bagwell 
Myrtle Bailey 
Helen Baldridge 
Lela Baldwin 
Audrey Barber 
Faye Barnes 
Georgia Biggerstaff 
Ellen Boney 
Nina Boone 
Ina Brooks 
Margaret Blythe 
Leafy Brown 
Maggie Brown 
Catherine Burns 



Effie Baynes 
Annie Beam 
Hallie Beavers 
Pattie Benton 
Savannah Blevins 
Aileen Boone 
Margaret Boseman 
Emmie Brown 
Bessie Cameron 
Charlotte Cameron- 
Eliza Capehart 
Cora Caudle 
Ellen Carson 
Stella Carver 
Annie Chandler 
Annie Clapp 
Nola Clark 
Elizabeth Coltrane 
Sallie Connor 
Annie Coppedge 
Ercell Corbett 
Vesta Council 
Leah Clarke 
Katharine Cobb 
Mabel Cooper 
Mary A. Cooper 
Iris Council 
Jane Cox 
Clara Culbertson 



Jennie Currie 
Olivera Cox 
Annie Daniel 
Lucy Davis 
Ethel Davis 
Alice Dawson 
Vernon Dean 
Clyde Deans 
Irma Deans 
Mary Dorrity 
Sidney Dowty 
Elsie Doxey 
Marjorie Duckworth 
Emory Doughton 
Kathleen Erwin 
Alice Ferebee 
Pearl Ferguson 
Martha Fields 
Myra Fleming 
Sadie Fountain 
Sue Fountain 
Annie Folcer 
Nellie Fusselle 
Zora Frye 
Annie Mae Fuller 
Lizzie Fuller 
Ruth Gaither 
Nina Garner 
Mary Garner 



Della Garren 
Martha Garris 
Irene Gilchrist 
Ruth Gill 
Lena Gill 
Eula Glasgow 
Annie Glenn 
Lena Glenn 
Mary Lee Gordon 
Annie Graeber 
Susan Green 
Mary Green 
Estelle Greenwood 
Jessie Groome 
May Gunter 
Ruth Gunter 
Mary Gwynn 
Sarah Gwynn 
Edith Haicht 
Alice Hall 
Elizabeth Hall 
Hildah Hancock 
Fountain Hamilton 
Margaret Harper 
Flossie Harris 
Ruth Harris 
Alice Hart 
Lucy Hatch 
Sarah C. Hendry 



Page one hundred twenty- three 



ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Blanche Hicks 
Julia B. Hodcin 

TlNSALORA HOEY 

Kathryn Hollincsworth 
Ellen Holmes 
Martha Hornthal 
Daisy Hendley 
Fannie Higcins 
Hallie Holloway 
Inez Honrine 
Elsie House 
Louise Howell 
Alice Hubbard 
Florence Hughes 
Annie Humbert 
Hfi.en Hunt 
Barbara Hunter 
Vinnie Lou Jackson 
Thessa Jimeson 
Cora John 
Marcaret John 
Katherine Johnson 
Helen Jones 
Kate Jones 
Louise L. Jones 
Naomi Joplin 
Ruth Joplin 
Vivian Jordan 
Octavia Jordan 



Ruth Kendall 
Ernestine Kennette 
Madge Kennette 
Lorena Kernodle 
Addie Klutz 
Sudie Landon 
Catherine Lapsley 
Sophie Lefler 
Edith Lineberger 
Mabel Lippard 
Elizabeth Long 
Yancey Long 
Emma Lossen 
Edwina Lovelace 
Louise Maddrey 
Thelma Mallard 
Alice Marrow 
Elizabeth Masemore 
Maude Mason 
Zilphia Massey 
Sadie McBrayer 
Alice McGee 
Edna McLean 
Vonnie McLean 
Henrietta McMillan 
Lula McPherson 
May McQueen 
Lila Melvin 
Sudie Mellichampe 



Emily Milam 
Millie Miller 
Olivia Miller 
Julia Milton 
Edith Mitchell 
Fannie Starr Mitchell 
Sarah Belle Monroe 
Eliza Moore 
Eva Moore 
Louise Moore 
Frances Morris 
Lillian Morris 
Elizabeth Moses 
Ethel Munroe 
Lena Neal 
Effie Newton 
Marie Norwood 
Mamie O'Brien 
Bertie Ozment 
Flossie Parker 
Nell Parkin 
Lillian Parrish 
Swanna Paschal 
Naomi Pate 
Clara Patterson 
Mary Paul 
Isabel Paylor 
Lottie Perry 
Ethel Phillippi 



Daisy Pinner 
Ethel Pinner 
Mamie Ruth Pollard 
Naomi Poole 
Mary Poteat 
Mary Powers 
Laura Price 
Katie Pridcin 
Ruth Reid 
Susie Rankin 
Marianne Richard 
Nellie Richardson 
Alice Robbins 
Irene Robbins 
Fannie Robertson 
Gena Robertson 
Magnolia Robertson 
Pearl Robertson 
Minnie Robinson 
Miriam Robertson 
Ellen Rose 

VlRCIE RODWELL 

Olivia Rogers 
Alice Sawyer 
Annie V. Scott 
Mary Sharpe 
Merrill Shelton 
Ruby Sidbury 
Flossie Siler 



Page one hundred Intents-four 



ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Eunice Sinclair 
Cora Si.oan 
Ada Smith 
Etta Schiffman 
Euline Smith 
Gertrude Smith 
Margaret Smith 
Edith Smoak 
Elsie Sparger 
Mildred Spiers 
Margaret Sparger 
Eulah Spruill 
Nancy Stacy 
Bertha Stanbury 
Alma Steadman 
Hazel Stephens 
Maeel Stephens 



Margaret Stevenson 
Norma Steward 
Rebecca Stimson 
Elzora Strupe 
Frances Summerell 
Edith Sumner 
Fannie Sumner 
Laura Sumner 
Leigh Tarkenton 
Brownie Taylor 
Ruth Taylor 
Sallie Teal 
Pearl Temple 
Bessie Terry 
Hattie Thicpen 
Susan Thompson 
Myrtle Tilley 



Linda Trogden 
Frances Tull 
Martha Tuttle 
Elithe Uzzell 
Ora Vail 
I la Watt 
Ethel Wells 
Grace Lee White 
Mildred White 
Pauline White 
Ruth White 
Addie Whitehurst 
Clara Whitley 
Bessie Whitson 
Louise Whittelsey 
Frances Wicker 
Marguerite Wiley 



Estelle Wilkinson 
Lena Williams 
Nannie Williams 
Pauline Williams 
Pearl Williams 
Lucile Williamson 
Emma Wilson 
Annie Winkler 
Lola Woltz 
Thelma Woodard 
Lois Wooten 
Kate Wortham 
Bessie Wright 
Alma Yokley 
Eddie Younge 




Page one hundred twenty-five 




Adelphian Literary Society 



Mrs. Myra Albright 
Miss Eunice Anderson 
Mr. Charlie J. Brock man 
Miss Rhoda Baxter 
Mrs. Estelle Boid 
Miss Laura Coit 



Faculty Members 

Miss Ione Dunn 
Miss Iola Exum 
Miss Harriett Eliott 
Miss Melville V. Fort 
Dr. Eugene W. Gudcer 
Miss Hinda T. Hill 



Miss Edith Imes 
Mr. W. C. Jackson 
Miss Minnie L. Jamison 
Miss Emma King 
Miss Emma Little 
Mr. J. A. Matheson 



Miss Julia Raines 

Miss Kathryn Severson 

Miss Etta Spier 

Miss Mary Tyler 

Miss Oeland Washburn 

Mrs. Lizzie McIver Weatherspoon 



Miss Gertrude Mendenhall 

Mr. R. A. Merritt 

Miss Anna Meade Micheaux 

Miss Alleine Minor 

Miss Mamie Mullen 

Miss Susie Purvis 



Page one hundred twenty-six 



L 



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& at 



v 



> 




CORNELIAN SOCIETY HALL 



Page one hundred twenty-nine 




CORNELIAN SOCIETY COMMITTEE ROOM 



Page one hundred (/i<r/J> 



>ong 



—Cornel 



ornena s r raises 



In joy and praise come let U3 sing, 

Wilh anthem clear and strong; 
Let all Cornelian voices ring 

In free, exultant song 
Of pride for that fair name we bear — 

Cornelia! Glorious word 
To make us gladly do and dare, 

Whene'er 'tis thought, whene'er 'tis heard. 



We'll onward, upward ever move, 

Our footsteps forward pressed; 
Together move in sister- love 

Unto the mountain's crest, 
To gain the fair, wide spreading view 

Which round the mountain lies, 
And gives us understanding new, 

Enlightening our eager eyes. 



May Cornelia's name have ne'er a stain 

From any daughter's deed. 
For her all glory will we gain 

And give her honor's meed ; 
For firm and staunch we e'er will stand 

Unto each other true, 
And loyal to our noble band, 

Hers — yea, her own, our whole lives through. 



Page one hundred thirty-one 




CORNELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page one hundred thirty-livo 




Ettie Abernathy 
Purcelle Adams 
Annie Albright 
Caroline Atkinson 
Bertie Lee Baker 

Annie Wall Baldwin 
Lottie Barber 

Helen Barnhardt 

Mary Ethel Barwick 
Christine Beaman 



Cornelian Literary Society 



Julia Cannady 

Gertrude Carraway 
Caroline Carter 

Mamie Kate Carter 

Anna Cavenauch 

Mamie Caudle 

Gladys Chadwick 
Ernestine Cherry 



Carrie Goforth 
Grace Goldston 
Gladys Goodson 



Winifred Beckwith 
Louise Bell 

Martha Bicgers 
Rosa Blakney 

Julia Holt Black 
Ruth Blythe 
Tempe Boddie 
Sallie Boddie 
Annie Bostian 
Hattie Boyd 



Cornelia Brady 
Joy Briggs 
Marguerite Brooks 
Julia Bryan 
Kate Bullard 
Maude Bunn 
Lelia Butner 
Anceline Caldwell 
Lois Campbell 



Mamie Cline 
Hattie Coats 
Vivian Cole 
Nellie Cole 
Lucy Coleman 

Inabelle Coleman 
Annie B. Cooke 
Lelia Cooper 
Hazel Cox 
Jeannete Cox 
Jessie Lee Cornelias 
Hattie Mae Covington 
Elizabeth Craddock 
Ethel Craig 



Lallah Daughety 
Eunice Daughety 
Mary Deans 

Martha Decker 
Estelle Dillon 

ROSELLE DlTMORE 

Anna Doggett 
Nellie Driver 
Lura Duckett 



Margaret Hall 
Pattie Groves 



Bessie Craven 
Myrtle Crews 
Pauline Crowder 
Grace Crumpler 
Fannie Darlington 
Christine Davis 
Julia Holt Davis 



Maude H. Duncan 
Mamie Eaton 
Carrie Elliott 
Emily Elliot 
Lillian Ellis 

Gladys Emmerson 
Elizabeth Evans 
Mary E. Fisher 
Ruth Faison 
Rebekah Flemminc 
Laura Murphy Faison 
Mae Louise Fallon 
Lizzie Forrester 



Mary Freshwater 
Margaret Futrel 
Lucy Gamble 
Ethie Carret 
Flora Garrett 
Annie Gattis 
Bertha Glenn 



Nell Hartman 
Ruth Hampton 



Page one hundred thirty-three 




CORNELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Elizabeth Harrison 
Helen Harrel 
Lena Hartsel 
Fannie Hatch 

Amelia Hawfield 
Claire Henley 
Francis Hendren 
Mabel Hendren 

Lottie Mae Hendrick 
Josie McCullers 
Alice Hockett 



Hallie Jones 
Louise Jones 
Eva Keeter 
Lenora Keeter 
Ida Keith 

Audrey Kennette 
Ruth Kernodle 
Flossie Kersey 



Jeannette Muscrove 
Helen Olliver 
Rosa Olliver 
Sarah Johnston 
Julia Johnson 



Pearl Hocan 
Mary Holden 
Mamie Hollow ay 
Gay Holman 

Laura Holt 
Mary Holt 
Esther Horn 
Iris Holt 
Lillian Howell 
Frankie Howard 
Lillian Hunt 



Dorothy Hunt 
Hattie Lee Horton 
Katherine Hoskins 
Maggie Howell 
Janie Ipock 
Nell Jacobs 
Gladys Jackson 



Mazie Kirkpatrick 
Belle Kornegay 
Lily Lancdon 
Ruby Lea 
Kate Leak 
Hallie Lecgett 
Lucile Leggett 

Marie Le Roy 
Hannah Lewis 
Mattie Lipe 
Arey Lipe 
Maria Loftin 
Martha Loftin 
Minnie Long 
Marie Lineberger 
Margaret Linker 



Maizel Lupton 
Ava Lee Lyon 
Ollie Lyon 

Isabelle McAlister 
Mattie McArthur 
Neolia McCrummin 

JUANITA McDoUGALD 

May McIntosh 
Jay McIver 



Irene Myatt 
Narva O'Daniel 
Lenora O'Daniel 
Kate Morrison 



Frances Lineberry 
Minnie Long 
Eva Lucas 
Grace Lucas 
Annie Lucas 



Margaret McIver 
Mattie McKinney 
Esther McNeal 
Flora Martin 
Lucinda Martin 
Nell Matheson 

Fannie Mebane 
May Meadow 
Emily Milam 
Belle Mitchell 
Esther Mitchell 
Vera Millsaps 
Margaret Matthews 
Margaret Merony 
Alberta Monroe 
Estelle Monroe 



Genevieve Moore 
Josephine Moore 
Mary Moore 
Willie Moore 



Belle Lupton 
Bertha Lupton 
Eleanor Morgan 
Mamie Morgan 



Page one hundred thirty-four 



Lila Owen 
Eula Parrish 
Sadie Patton 
Vivian Paylor 
Annie Pierson 
Sybyle Penny 

Margaret Petrie 
Acnes Petrie 

Dorothy Phelps 
Lizzie Phillips 



CORNELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Ruth Roth 
Pearl Seagraves 
Effie Settle 
Pauline Shaver 

Marguerite Sherrill 
Sarah Shuford 
Ada Simpson 
Leah Slaughter 
Minnie Smith 
Helen Smith 
Lettie Smith 
Lucy Smithwick 



Winifred Turlington 
Niner Turner 

Lillian Wakefield 
Lila Walsh 

Belle Walters 
Onida Watson 
Lillian Watson 
Eugenia Watson 



Beatrice Yarbrough 
Mary Worth 
Nola Wagstaff 



Annie Mae Woodside 
Lois Workman 
Estelle Wilson 



De Luke Pinkston 
Bessie Pinkston 
Rochelle Pippin 
Bonnie Pippin 
Clara Powell 
Annie Pruett 
Mary Powell 
J u anita Puett 
Alice Pool 
Ida Porter 



Julia Rand 
Elma Rankin 
Gladys Rawlins 
Artie Lee Puett 
Lillian Reeves 
Izona Rices 
Pattie Robertson 
Rosa Robertson 
Caroline Robinson 
Elizabeth Rogers 



Annie Spainhour 
Mary Spurgeon 
Janie Stacy 

Annie Stevens 
Flossie Stout 
Norma Styron 
Mabel Swanson 
Lynette Swain 
Maude Tate 



Ruth Tate 
Christine Tatum 
Thelma Temple 
Irene Templeton 
Annie Tennent 
Ethel Thomas 
Reita Thompson 
Natalie Tuck 
Willie Mae Stratford 



Acnes Warren 
Emma Warren 
Anne Watkins 
Annie Lee Webb 
Belle West 
Nettie White 
Adelaide White 

Louise Whitley 
Evelyn Whitty 
Lucy Wiggins 
Lois Wilkins 
Alice Williams 
Margaret Williams 
Margaret Willis 
Eloise Willofred 
Marie Whitehurst 
Mary Wilson 



Carey Wilson 
Verd Wilson 
Annie Witty 
Imogene Scott 

Elizabeth Woodruff 



Kate Mae Streetman 
Sadie Woodruff 
Clee Yelverton 
Lema Yokley 



Page one hundred thirty-five 



y> 



CORNELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 
Faculty Members 



Mr. E. E. Balcomb 
Miss Viola Boddie 

Mr. Wade R. Brown 
Miss Eva Bryan 



Miss Pattie McAdams Miss Mattie E. Williams 

Miss Laura McAllister 

Miss Mary B. Mitchell 
Miss Mary T. Moore 



Miss Clara B Byrd 

Miss Mary King Daniel 
Miss Eleanore Elliot 

Miss Ruth Fitzgerald 
Mr. E. J. Forney 
Dr. J. I. Foust 
Miss Ethel Gardner 



Miss Sue Nash 

Miss Sally Neal 

Miss Annie Petty 

Miss Elizabeth Potwine 
Mr. W. C. Smith 
Miss Cora Strong 
Mrs. Mary Settle Sharp 



\ 



Mr. W. C. A. Hammel 
Miss Ethel Harris 
Dr. Grace Huse 
Miss Alma Long 



Miss Gertrude Sousley 
Miss Jane Summerell 
Miss Mary Petty 
Mrs. Eliza Wollard Miss Christine R. A. Reincken 



Page one hundred thirty-six 




The Marshals 




HAT are the Marshals; what is a Marshal? Many and desperate have been our attempts to define Marshal- 
ship, and at last our only conclusion is that it is a quantity indefinable, a variable approaching we know 
not what as a limit. You see, your conception of these marshal beings depends altogether upon your point 
of view. If you are so fortunate as to be a Freshman, very likely you retain a vivid image of the day soon 
after your arrival when some gay Sophomore caught you by the sleeve, and, finger on lips, motioned you 
off the cement walk, to let pass a long, tall, austere personage whom the Sophomore, in sepulchral tones, denominated a 
MARSHAL! And in the course of the year, you have discovered the identity of ten other such dignitaries, and have 
duly beheld them, sash bedight and rose bedecked, executing a dignified pace to the adoring gaze of the multitude. Very 
likely, too, you have marked the superior authority of one among them called chief, she who bears bouquets to performers 
on the stage, and have noted the inferiority of the Back-Door Marshals, those high Juniors, and have secretly hoped that 
if ever such dizzy fortune as to be a Marshal should fall to your lot, it should happen not two but three years from now. 
Throughout your Freshman year you have worshipped these mysterious people from afar. 

But if you are a Sophomore, you have probably found out that not all Marshals are long nor tall nor even austere, 
and that it is good form to whisper a compliment when a Marshal conducts you to your place, and moreover that the 
strictest etiquette enjoins you to occupy the seat in the building farthest remote from the one that the Marshal has shown you. 
Furthermore, if you are possessed of the alertness of the genuine Sophomore variety, while you have truly learned that 
the Marshal has power to conjugate the verb "to report," perhaps you have also discovered, if you are properly tactful, the 
secret of convincing her that the most effective use of her ominous verb is in the future less vivid construction. If you are 
a true Sophomore, too, you know that it is proper to congratulate your friend upon being elected to the honorable position of 
Marshal, yet in your heart to loathe with mortal antipathy the thought of ever becoming such a thing yourself. 

In your Juniorhood, you begin to venture to criticise these super-human beings. You set up your standards of perfec- 
tion to which a Marshal must attain both before and after her election — standards vastly apart — and you hold her to them 
relentlessly. You have also settled in your head your candidates for the next election. You talk much of executive ability, 
good appearance, and strong character. You begin to electioneer. After the election, you vow that, though your one par- 
ticular candidate was not elected, you are satisfied, and the new order has your support. Then you eagerly join the discus- 
sion of satins and fringes, and labor feverishly over tiny stitches. And at the last entertainment before Commencement, 
you are initiated into the arduous art of tying a regalia — during which performance you discover your idol to be a human 
being after all, possessed of the patience and nerves of a very live human being too. At the last minute, you push the hair 



Page one hundred thirty-seven 




The Marshals 



Willie May Stratford, Mecklenburg County 

ADELPHIAN 

Fannie Robertson Robeson County 

Mary Green Davidson County 

Nina Garner Carteret County 

Edith Avery Burke County 

Kathleen Erwin Transylvania County 



Chief 

CORNELIAN 

Jeannette Muscrove Halifax County 

Sarah Perrin Shuford Catawba County 

Marguerite Brooks Guilford County 

Mary Worth New Hanover County 

Louise Whitley Stanly County 



Page one hundred thirty-eight 



THE MARSHALS— CONTINUED 

out of your eyes, you slip over to the Students' Building, you creep to a back seat and you watch your handiwork disport 
itself. That year you leave school a Senior, at peace with the world and the Marshals. 

As a Senior, these people known as Marshals disturb you very little. At first you wonder whether you ought not to 
regard them as impudent young upstarts who think they own the earth, or as precocious infants who deserve a pat on the 
cheek, or whether, since you know and everyone else knows that you could do their work so much better than they, you 
ought not utterly to ignore their existence. But after things have settled down a bit, you begin to take the Marshals, like 
everything else, as a matter of course; they bother you little save now and then when they call on you to tie their regalias. 

There is also the Marshal in the eyes of the visitor. If you are a visitor, she must be the rather dressed up young 
person who, for seeming hours, keeps you standing foolishly in the aisle until she finally shows you to the seat right before 
your nose, and who proceeds on her way without giving you a program. 

Likewise, if you are a member of the Faculty you probably have an opinion of the Marshals. Sometimes you speak 
of them as "college officials," further than that you keep your own counsel. 

And then there is the Marshal as she is to herself. You, the Marshal, have a heart that is humility itself. Inwardly, 
you live a martyr to the consciousness that you are the authorized representative of all that is good and noble. Inwardly, 
you labor under the impression that you are pledged to be perfect — very pure and saintly is your conception of your Mar- 
shal's duty. Outwardly, you bear yourself erect, and however belligerently your person be attacked, you sternly close the 
dining room door to all the late comers. Outwardly, you are the keeper of all the thoughtless tongues of all the thought- 
less maids in chapel ; truly, they are a grievous affliction to your virtues. Outwardly, at every public occasion at the 
College you are a walking manifestation of hours spent beforehand at the mirror. Outwardly, you must always "keep your 
head," for you know perfectly that you bear the State Normal and Industrial College upon your shoulders. 

And if you are an ex-Marshal, a Senior who was a Marshal in her Junior year, then you know what it is to be a 
Sibyl. Oh, strange and marvelous are your oracular utterances! Your patronizing grace is beautiful to behold. 

After all, the Marshal is but an individual very much like every other individual, except that perhaps she takes herself 
a trifle more seriously than is the habit of the rest of us. 

— Eleanor Morgan, '14. 



Page one hundred thirty-nine 




Page one hundred forty 




Inter-Society Debaters 

Query: "Resolved, That without regard to the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty, the tolls at 
the Panama Canal should be the same for the merchant vessels of all nations." 



Affirmative 



Negative 



Cornelian Literary Society 
Pattie Groves 
Eleanor Morgan 



Adelphian Literary Society 
Edith Avery 
Mary Green 

Won by the Negative. 



Page one hundred forty-one 






r 




MAGAZINE STAFF 



Page one hundred forl\)-i'-i>o 



Page one hundred forty-three 



State Normal Magazine 

Miss Martha E. Winfield Advisory Editor 

Board of Editors 



ADELPHIAN 

May McQueen, '14, Chief 

Annie V. Scott, '14 

Edith C. Haight, '15 



Business Manacers 

Pattie J. Groves, '14, Chief 
Hallie Beavers, '15, Assistant 



CORNELIAN 

Eleanor Morgan, '14 
Annie Bostian, '14 
Julia Cannaday, '15 




THE STUDENTS COUNCIL 



Page one hundred for'.y-four 



The Students' Council 

Officers 

Willie May Stratford President 

Ruth Harris Vice-President 

Annie Spainhour Secretary 




HE Students' Council, organized in 1910, is composed of three representatives from each of the four regular 
college classes, with the Chief Marshal as President. For four years this Council has attempted to bring 
about measures intended for the welfare of the College. Through its successes and failures, the need for 
student government has been made manifest. Under the constitution for self-government which the Council, 
aided by the Marshals, has drawn up, and which will go into effect in the Fall of 1914, the students will form 
themselves into a self-government association with the following officers: President (Senior), Vice-President (Senior), Sec- 
retary (Junior), Treasurer (Sophomore). The government is to be administered by three separate boards, — a Legislative, 
a Judicial, and an Executive Board. The Legislative Board, composed of the President of the Association and three 
representatives from each of the classes in College, including the special and preparatory classes, will formulate all new 
rules for government and present them to the Association for ratification. The Executive Board, consisting of the four officers 
of the Association, the chairman of each house committee, and one representative from each class, will carry into effect all 
the rules laid down in the Constitution and By-Laws. The judicial power of the Association will be vested in a joint session 
of the Legislative and Executive Boards called the Judicial Board. Any student who becomes dissatisfied with the decision 
of this Board has the right to appeal to the whole Association. 

An Advisory Board from the Faculty of the College will keep in close touch with the student organization. Thus 
the Students' Council supported by the loyal student body, and encouraged by the Faculty, has been able to bring about 
the condition in the College which makes it possible for the students to assume individual and community responsibility. 



Page one hundred forty-five 




THE COLLEGE CHORUS 



Page or.e hundred forty-six 




The College Chorus 




HEN Mr. Brown first came to the Normal in the Fall of 1912, he decided to supplement the desultory prac- 
tice gained in gymnastics and tournament athletics with a regular course, the purpose of which was to develop 
the vocal powers of a selected class. About one hundred and twenty-five of the most promising candidates 
were chosen from the student body, and put through a severe test of exercises for one hour each Saturday 
morning. A notable exhibition of the progress of this class, dubbed "the chorus", was made in the Com- 
mencement Concert last year. Soon after the college opened this year, Mr. Brown invited all who wished to fill vacancies 
in his class to call on him in his classroom. That a great many did so is a proof of popularity of his training among the 
students. These endeavored to display their qualifications for membership by singing hymn tunes over and over, up and 
down the scale. Finally the ranks were filled and work began in earnest, first for an exhibition in November at the instal- 
lation of the organ, and then for the Christmas Vesper service. On both of these occasions, the chorus acquitted itself with 
honor before large audiences of Greensboro people. The singing of The Hallelujah Chorus from The Messiah, Unfold 
Ye Portals from The Redemption are notable among its performances. The Easter and Commencement concerts are other 
occasions in which the chorus plays a large part. Both from the standpoint of vocal training and of musical education, 
the chorus has been a decided success in our college. 



Page one hundred forty-seven 







The College Orchestra 



Mary Powers, Violin 
Margaret Petrie, Violin 
Leah Slaughter, Violin 
Helen Hunt, Violin 



Mr. C. J. Brockmann 

Louise Whitley, Violin 
Gay Holman, Violin 
Ruby Sidbury, Violin 
Emmie Brown, Violin 
Annie Tennent, Flute 



Director 



Sadie Fristoe, Violin 
May McQueen, Clarinet 
Estelle Dillon, Cornet 
Juanita Puett, Cornet 
Genevieve Moore, Piano 



Margaret Harper, 'Cello 
Helen Oliver, 'Cello 
Ruth Gaither, Bass 
Louise Bell, Drums 



Page one hundred forty-eight 



I 






Unser Deutsches Kraenzchen 

UR German Wreath was organized last Fall at the advice of our instruc- 
tor, Miss Reincken. As our college course gave little time for conver- 
sational German, we decided to have an organization, the object of which 
would be to develop us along that line. This organization is divided 
into two parts — the Prima and the Secunda. The former is composed 
of members of the Senior and Junior German classes ; the latter, of the Sophomore class. 
The President comes from the Prima, the Vice-President from the Secunda, and a 
Treasurer from each. These officers are elcted twice during the session. 

At these meetings, we disregard the old adage, "Work while you work and play 
while you play." For while we are working toward our goal, we are playing games, 
and while we are playing these games we are attempting to speak in German. Thus 
our speaking ability has come to exceed the limited number of expressions as Jawohl, Ich 
liebe dich, and Ich verstehe Sie nicht, though the last is still the most popular. 



Page one hundred forty nine 




CURRENT TOPICS CLUB 



Page one hundred fifty 



^ 




Current Topics Club 

Officers 
fall term 

Mary Green President 

Agnes Warren Secretary-Treasurer 

SPRING TERM 

Willie May Stratford President 

Ethie Garrett Secretary-Treasurer 

ON Monday evenings, the Senior History Class seasons its routine fare of Jacksonian 
progress and Civil War results with a spice of Current Topics. Each week the 
Literary Digest furnishes a fresh supply of this condiment, and occasionally Mr. 
Jackson or Miss Elliott brings the club a concentrated solution of such problems as 
Wcman Suffrage, the Mexican Situation, Labor Unions, and Credit end Banking. Like 
all spices, this one has the effect of stimulating an appetite for solid academic food, and 
of increasing the desire for its own pungent flavor. 



Page one hundred fifty-one 




Carolina Pen Point 

Officers 

Edith C. Haight President 

Julia Cannady Vice-President 

Ruth Harris Secretary-Treasurer 

Edith C. Avery Literary Director 

Members 

Daisy Hendley 
Mazie Kirkpatrick 
May McQueen 

l™N7 HE Carolina Pen Point is a literary club organized under 
E^2w the auspices of the United Amateur Press Association 
Q^ffjfyWl °f America. Its aim is to promote literary activity 
jj5|^5ig^)] among amateurs. It was organized in the spring of 
1913 by a few enthusiasts. During that spring the club 
held only three meetings, but during the following summer regular corre- 
spondence was carried on in order that the members might be kept in 
touch with one another. In regard to the work of the Club, it may be 
said that since the opening of College in September, 1913, the Carolina 
Pen Point has contributed a definite amount of material each month for 
the college magazine, and has, in addition, edited two papers jointly 
with a number of similar clubs in other parts of the country. In the 
future the Club hopes to edit a paper all its own. Correspondence 
with other clubs is kept up, and this is a constant source of inspiration. 
There is a board of criticism composed of competent judges to which 
one may send her literary productions for criticism. Through this 
organization many who are now conspicuous in the literary world first 
found themselves. 

— Ruth Harris. 



Page one hundred fifty-two 




iramaitra 



' 






Dramatics 

Officers 

Margaret Smith Stage Manager 

Mazie Kirkpatrick Business Manager 

Effie Baynes Secretary and Treasurer 

Coline Austin Prompter 

Frances Summerell Mistress of WarJrohe 

Members 
Cornelians Adelphians 

Louise Bell Margaret Smith 

Gertrude Carraway Emma Wilson 

Gladys Emerson Katherine Cobb 

Esther Mitchell Kate Jones 

Sarah Perrin Shuford Edith Avery 

Maud Bunn Gladys Avery 

Mazie Kirkpatrick Hildah Mann 

Lalla Daughety Frances Summerell 

Louise Whitley Lizzie Fuller 

Carey Wilson Coline Austin 

Lynette Swain Kathleen Erwin 

Lillian Wakefield Effie Baynes 

Elizabeth Craddock Edith Haicht 

ris Holt Lorena Kernodlf 

Fannie Starr Mitchell 



Page one hundred fifty-four 




THE DRAMATIC CLUB 



Page one hundred fifty-five 




CHRISTMAS TREE — CORNELIAN SOCIETY 



Page one hundred fifty-six 




DISTRICT SCHOOL — PRESENTED BY THE SENIOR MEMBERS OF CORNELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page one hundred fifly-seven 




■t ■ 

j 

'.' 

King Rene's Daughter 

Presented by the Cornelian Literary Society in Honor of the Adelphian Society 

Cast of Characters 

King Rene Sallie Sumner 

Count Triston Louise Whitley 

Count Geoffrey JuLlA Bryan 

Bertrand Sallie Boddie 

Dolanthe Lillian Wakefield 

Martha Carey Wilson 

The Moor Genevieve Moore 



Page one hundred fifty-eight 




Page one hundred fifty-nine 




Miss Fearless and Company— Cornelian Literary Society 



Cast of Characters 



Margaret Henly Lillian Wakefield 

Bettie Reynolds Esther Mitchell 

Barbara Livingston Tempe Boddie 

Marion Thornhill Kate May Streetman 

Sarah Jane Lovejoy 



Just Lizzie Iris Holt 

Aunt Euphenia Lalla Dauchety 

Miss Alibi \ l . Jeannette Muscrove 

Miss Alias } Two Sisters \ . . Lucinda Martin 

. Gladys Emerson 



Page 



hundred si'xhj 





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SCENE FROM MISS FEARLESS AND COMPANY — CORNELIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page one hundred sixty-one 




The Land of Heart's Desire- Cornelian Literary Society 

Cast of Characters 

Maurteen Bruin Carrie Goforth 

Shawn Bruin Anna Cavenaugh 

Father Hart HELEN Barnhart 

Bridget Bruin HaTTIE Boyd 

Marie Bruin Emily Gray 

A Fairy Child Dorothy Phelps 



Page one hundred sixty-tn>o 




Page one hundred sixty- three 



~* 




Page one hundred sixty-four 



_ 



"> 




TABLEAU — THE FATES — ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page one hundred sixty-five 




JENNIE WREN — RUTH RE1D, ADELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page one hurdred sixty-six 




Page one hundred sixty-sex>en 




SCENE FROM DAVID COPPERFIELD —PRESENTED BY ADELPH1AN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Page one hundred sixty-eight 









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Scene from "Daves Baby" -Adelphian Literary Society 



Cast of Characters 

Rex Manson, a bachelor L.ORENA Kernocle Dorothy Thorne, David's daughter 

Bridget, Rex's Irish housekeeper . 
Hallie Beavers 



David Thorne, a college mate of Rex .... Emmie Brown 
Pete, his colored valet 



Merrill Shelton 
Bessie Terry 



Page one hundred sixty nine 




THE TWO WAGERS THAT CAME OF THEM 



Page one hundred seven 1 ); 




W'- 




Athletic Association 




THLETICS constitute a most important phase in our college 
life. Among the many points in its favor are two that are 
pre-eminent. First, the physical development of the students, 
which cannot be emphasized too much. Second, the whole- 
some rivalry aroused at tournaments. There, the different classes con- 
test for the cups and show fine class spirit, not of bitter competition, 
but of intense enthusiasm. 

In March, 1913, our annual inter-class Basketball Tournament was 
held. The four regular College classes and the Second Preparatory 
Class took part. It was an unusually interesting contest, the final game 
being played between the classes of 1914 and 1915, the latter winning 
the cup. 

Every Spring one day is set apart solely for athletic sports. Each 
stunt counts so many points, and the class receiving the greatest number 
of points wins the silver cup. Field Day for last Spring was observed 
April 18, 1913. The order of events was: drill, eighty-yard dash, 
two-foot hurdle race, running high jump, double relay race, and dodge 



ball. One hundred and fifty students took part in Field Day games. 
The class of 1914 won the cup. 

Last year there were two Tennis Tournaments held. One was the 
regular Tennis Tournament held in April, in which all four College 
classes and the First and Second Preparatory classes look part. The 
last game was played between the First Preparatory class and the class 
of 1914. The latter won the cup. The players in the other Tennis 
Tournament, held on April 29, 1913, were girls who learned the game 
during that school year. Ellen Rose was the winner in this contest. 

On Thanksgiving there was a mock football game. The Junior, 
Freshman, and Special classes played against the Senior, Sophomore, 
and Preparatory classes, the former winning. 

Our annual Hockey Tournament was held in December, 1913. 
Besides the four College classes the Preparatory class entered this 
Tournament. The last game was played between the classes of 
1915 and 1914, the latter winning the cup. 



Officers 

Effie Baynes President 

Margaret Sparger Treasurer 

Frances Summerell Critic 

Frances Morris, Spring Term | 

Mary Gwynn, Fall Term ( Secretaries 



Louise Alexander 
Hallie Beavers 



VICE-PRESIDENTS 
Senior . . Anne Watkins Esther Mitchell .... Sophomore 

Junior . . Pauline Shaver Frances Morris .... Freshman 

Lucile Legett .... Preparatory . . . Dorothy Phelps 



Sarah Gwynn 
Isabel McAllister 



Page one hundred seventy-three 




OFFICERS OF THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Page one hundred seventy-four 



> 




Field Day Record —Winners 

Running High Jump, 4 f I. 2 in Margaret Smith, '14 

80-yd. Dash, II 2-5 seconds Frances Summerell, '16 

Hop, Step, Jump, 19 ft., 7 in Esther Mitchell, '16 

Base Ball Throw, 158 ft., 4 in Nannie Rose 

Hurdle, 5 3-5 seconds Clara Whitley, '14 



Page one hundred sevenly-five 




Forwards 



Emma Wilson 
Louise Bell 



Senior Hockey Team— Champion 



Nina Garner 



Captain 



Half-Backs 

Elizabeth Hall 

Effie Baynes 

Willie May Stratford 



Wings 

Winifred Turlington 
Margaret Smith 
GOAL Cora John 



Full-Backs 

Bessie Terry 
Margaret Sparger 



Page one hundred seventy-six 



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Forwards 

Mary Wilson 
Hallie Beavers 



Junior Hockey Team 



Louise Whitley Captain 

Wings 

Gertrude Carraway 
Mazie Kirkpatrick 
Goal Gladys Avery 



Half-Backs 

Julia Bryan 
Merrill Shelton 
Mary Worth 



Full-Backs 

Edith Haicht 
Margaret Willis 



Page one hundred seventy-seven 




Forwards 

Sarah Gwynn 
Elizabeth Craddock 



Sophomore Hockey Team 

Flora Garrett Captain 



Wings 

Mary Gwynn 
Margaret Linker 

Goal 

Margaret Harper 



Half-Backs 

Janie Ipock 
Esther Mitchell 
Anna Doggett 



Full-Backs 

Savannah Blevins 
Caroline Robinson 



Page one hundred seventy-etehl 




Forwards 

Norma Styron 
Annie Daniels 



Freshman Hockey Team 

Kate Jones Captain 



Wings 

Juanita McDougal 
Frances Morris 

Goal 

Gladys Rawlins 



Half-Backs 

Elizabeth Evans 
Hattie Coats 
Catherine Lapsley 



Full-Backs 

Annie Tennent 
Isabel McAllister 



Page one hundred seventy-nine 




Forwards 

Dorothy Phelps 
Emmie Brown 



Preparatory Hockey Team 

Yancey Long Captain 



Wings 

Willie Moore 
Eloise Willeford 

Goal 

Alma Stedman 



Half-Backs 

Aileen Boone 
Margaret Meroney 
Belle Kornegay 



Full-Backs 

Lucile Legcett 
Lula McPherson 



Page one hundred eighty 




CHAMPION TENNIS 1913 WINIFRED TURLINCTON, MARGARET SMITH 



Page one hundred eighty-one 




Senior Basketball Team 



WiLLiE May Stratford 



Goals 

Marcaret Smith 
Gladys Goodson 
Winifred Turlington 



Guards 

Nina Garner 
Margaret Sparger 
Elizabeth Hall 



Captain 

Centers 

Louise Bell 
Effie Baynes 



Page one hundred eighty-tnio 



^ 




Junior Basketball Team 



Goals 

Louise Whitley 
Lillian Reeves 
Vera Klutz 



Julia Bryan .... 

Guards 

Ethel Wells 
Janie Stacy 
Kathleen Erwin 



Captain 

Centers 

Edith Haicht 
Audrey Kennette 



Substitutes 

Vonnie McLean 
Pauline Shaver 



Page one hundred eighl\,-three 




Goals 

Flora Garrett 
Laura Anderson 
octavia jordon 



Sophomore Basketball Team 



Frances Summerell 



Guards 

Lucy Hatch 
Caroline Robinson 
Ruth Tate 



Captain 

Centers Substitutes 

Tempe Boddie Esther Mitchell 

Janie Ipoch Margaret Harper 



Page one hundred eighty-four 







yy\c»M 





"•nrfc-H/u 






Statistics 




CAREY WILSON 

POET 
'She could songs make and well indite. 



ELEANOR MORGAN 

MOST LITERARY 

'By you the unborn shall have communion 
Of what we feel and what doth us befall." 




Page one hundred eighty-*even 



STATISTICS 



LOUISE BELL 

MOST MUSICAL 
"What passion cannot music raise and quell?' 




EMMA LOSSEN 

OUR ARTIST 

High is our calling, Friend! Creative art 
Demands the service of a mind and heart." 




HO 



Page one hundred eighty-eight 



STATISTICS 




DeLUKE PINKSTON 

MOST STUDIOUS 
There is unspeakable pleasure attending 
the life of a voluntary student." 



GERTRUDE CARRAWAY 

BEST ALL ROUND GIRL 
I am a part of all that I have met." 




Page one hundred eighty-nine 



r 



STATISTICS 



ETHEL THOMAS 

MOST INDEPENDENT 

"He is a fool who thinks by force or skill 

To turn the current of a woman's will." 





PATTIE GROVES 

MOST PRACTICAL 
Rich in saving common sense. 



L 



Page one hundred ninety 




STATISTICS 




MARGARET SMITH 

MOST TALENTED 
On whom did Nature pour her bounties forth 
With such a full and unwithdrawing hand." 

BEST DANCER 

" Did never creature pass 
So slightly, musically made, 
So light upon the grace." 



MAUD BUNN 

MOST POPULAR 
" A friend to all the country dear." 




Page one hundred ninety-one 



STATISTICS 



MARY WORTH 

MOST WOMANLY 
A certain soothing charm, a vital grace 
That breathes of the eternal womanly." 





EDITH AVERY 

MOST LOVABLE 
Thou would'st be loved? Then let thy heart 
From its present pathway part not." 



Page one hundred ninety)- two 



STATISTICS 




GLADYS AVERY 

HANDSOMEST 
Symmetry of form and feature." 




JEANNETTE MUSGROVE 

TYPICAL SENIOR 
" Grace was in her step, 
In her every gesture dignity." 







Page one hundred ninety-three 



STATISTICS 




WINIFRED TURLINGTON 

MOST ATHLETIC 
In all games, nimble and in running swift; 
Well made to strike, to leap, to throw, to lift." 



LILA MELVIN 

MOST OPTIMISTIC 
God's in His Heaven 
All's right with the world." 






. 



Page one hundred ninety-four 



STATISTICS 



1 



LALLA DAUGHETY 

WITTIEST 
Wit is the salt of conversation." 



FRANCES SUMMERELL 

BEST ACTRESS 
Whose every look and gesture was a joke 
To clapping theatres and shouting crowds." 




Page one hundred ninety-five 



- 



STATISTICS 



ELIZABETH MOSES 

MOST ATTRACTIVE 
She binds you with a subtle, witching wile." 




RUTH HARRIS 

DAINTIEST 

" And she herself is sweeter than the sweetest 

thing she knows." 



Page one hundred ninety-six 



STATISTICS 




NATALIE TUCK 

QUESTION MARK 
How thro' the buzzing crowd she threads her way, 
To catch the flying rumors of the day." 



CLYDE DEANS 

INFORMATION BUREAU 

But if there is anything in which I shine 
'Tis in arranging all my friends affairs." 




Page one hundred ninety-seven 




The Inside View of the College 

SP^w^ijI COLLEGE is a collection of people engaged in numerous pursuits, all of which are supposed to lead to a 
common end — the fuller development of each individual. All colleges have much in common; yet each 
college has its distinctive features. In this collection of our college views, we are attempting to present our 
own college life regardless of whether the pictures presented are peculiar to us, or common to colleges in 
general. Our pictures and write-ups show our life from various angles. 

In this particular section, we are trying to express in a series of sketches some of our 

ordinary experiences. 

At 12:30 o'clock on school days, Jim, the Main Building janitor, hurries out 

behind the library across the grass to the bell. He clutches the dangling rope and 

looses the iron tongue of the sounding monster. Then he sits down on the plank 

balanced on the 8 x 5 granite block under the bell, and waits. Presently he pulls the 

rope again. Then from every building on the campus come throngs of girls, lean and 

fat, long and short, with arms full of books and with none, with tired faces, and with 

faces pink from a period's gymnastics. In one great body, they swarm up the steps 

and inside the Students' Building. Finally the last late-comer runs up the steps, the 

Faculty sedately enter, and Jim goes back to his post in the Main Building, leaving 

the campus as empty as he found it. 

Meanwhile, in the interior of the Students' Building, a transformation has taken 

place. At Jim's first stroke of the bell, practice pianos behind the rostrum were going 

noisily, but the hall in front was empty and still. Now the first comers go slowly to 

their places, gaze for the nth time at the portraits on the walls, and wonder whom 

they represent. Soon the rush begins. The crowds on the steps scatter over the hall 

from which a very slight murmur rises until all are in their seats. Then Dr. Foust 

comes forward and announces the hymn. The organ sounds its sweet tones, and 

chapel service has begun. Then follow the prayer, and Scripture lesson, and the 




Page one hundred ninety-eight 




second hymn. After the last amen the exit begins, accompanied by the organ's deep 
notes. This is the regular program which is lengthened by an occasional visitor, to the 
boredom or enjoyment of the assembly. Essentially, however, each day's order is 
like that of every other day. 

¥ ¥ *r v 

A rainy day is a rainy day anywhere, but a rainy day at the Normal is particularly 
so. We wake up ten minutes after prep has rung to hear the patter of rain on the 
walks, and get a gloomy outlook on the world. After a frantic search for an umbrella 
and raincoat, all those unfortunates out of Spencer gallop through the downpour to 
breakfast. There they meet those who have hardly discovered the rain and who look 
surprised to hear the outsiders bemoan the loss of their overshoes during the last rain. 
A whole day follows full of vain attempts to keep sight of an available umbrella. 
About 1 o'clock Miss Pattie, all properly equipped with raincoat, overshoes, and 
umbrella, goes for the Infirmary mail, and woe betide that girl she finds less com- 
pletely fitted out. By chapel time, everybody is bedraggled and weary of the rain, 
the gloom, and the load of books she is trying to keep dry. After lunch, those who 
have to go to classes console themselves with the thought that there will be no walking 
period. The rain keeps up intermittently until about 3:30 o'clock, when it perversely 
decides to stop. By 4 o'clock there are all signs of a clear evening. Walking period bell rings at 4:30; you 
windows and doors, and set out resolutely to tramp the slowly drying walks for a perfectly good hour you might 
making fudge or doing embroidery. 

tP flf* *i* *t* 




open your 
have spent 



The first ambition of every new Normal girl has always been to get a room in Spencer Building. It is stated officially 
each year that only one girl failed to apply for a room in Spencer, and she probably knew nothing of the custom or she 
would have done so. About one hundred of the two hundred and ninety new girls achieve their ambition, and live in 
contentment until they take a look at Senior Hall or the New Dormitory with its spacious rooms and closets, long mirrors, 
and individual dressers. Then envy of their grandeur destroys half the joy of a room in Spencer. In years past, 
before the day of Senior Hall, Spencer was the sole harbor of greatness, the seat of power. Now no one can locate these 



Page one hundred ninety-nine 



r 




much-desired qualities. They are scattered abroad. When upper classmen deliberately select Teague and Guilford Hall, 
new girls cannot but doubt the absolute superiority of Spencer. This is a day of change and democratic progress. Spencer 
is witnessing her decline in power. Probably the New Dormitory, even though far from classrooms and dining hall, will 

yet be the choice place of residence. Guilford Hall, old in years, memories, and wall 
coverings, will still be occupied cheerfully by those who value nearness to classes, and 
morosely by those who covet unlimited space for numerous hats, evening dresses, and 
prosaic necessities such as chafing dishes and choice copies of George Barr McCutcheon. 
But since this is a democratic institution, the really preferable building and room will 
never be discovered. For with Miss Kirkland there is no respect of rooms. Each 
one of us takes her assignment and rejoices that she did not get a room she objected 
to more than the particular one she did get. 

**■ *ip *J* T* 

Among the six hundred of us, there are always the ailing. They are in two classes, 
the chronic ailers and the chance ailers. The chronic ailers give occupation to Miss 
Pattie and Dr. Huse and make them earn their pay. They spend week-ends with Miss 
Pattie with the same grace that the rest of us spend a free day in the library or on the 
tennis court. 1 herefore when we consider the Infirmary as a place for acquirement of 
unique experiences, we can hardly consider their viewpoint. It is the chance and 
perhaps acute ailer who really knows the Infirmary as a house apart. 

Behold the timid Freshman with her first ailment, a blistered heel. She goes to see 
Miss Pattie, exactly at the right time — immediately after breakfast — and is instructed to remove her shoes while Miss Pattie 
bustles about, preparing a hot water examination. The inexperienced new girl dares not but insert her foot in the steaming water 
nor remove it before the august lady's good pleasure. After a thorough investigation of the trouble, she is directed to send for 
her suitcase and take a room upstairs. There she is duly installed on a high bed with the foot, now blistered all over instead of 
merely on the heel, placed in an antiseptic solution just from the boiler. When hope begins to rise in the heart of the unfortunate 
cripple with the growing comfort of her foot in the cooling water, the maid arrives with a freshly heated supply. About 
noon, the young lady receives her books and other impedimenta. Never did a French grammar seem so refreshing. Even 
a Latin lexicon has a lovingly familiar look. She attacks her Cicero with enthusiasm and reads beyond the assignment. 




Page two hundred 



The last English prose selection is quickly devoured. At last, when interest in all these things wanes, she falls back on all the 
"Memory Gems" she ever acquired. Bible verses and Shakespearean quotations are invoked to pass the time away. Just 
as she reaches the end of her mental resources, she hears walking period bell ring and longs to walk, even limp, for hours 
if only she may see and talk to one living person on the way A letter from her roommate is a godsend, a bunch of 
violets from a thoughtful friend, a boon never to be forgotten, a book from her next-door neighbor, an oasis in the desert. 
Never have small kindnesses had such value for her. After two or three more days that pass like centuries for her with her 
foot always soaking, and her mind always blank because of lack of human companionship other than that of Miss Pattie 
once a day, and a much be-coiffured maid at more frequent intervals, she is released, cured of various ailments, the least of 
which is a blistered heel. If ever the roommate be taken to the Infirmary, her thoughtfulness will be unbounded, her watch- 
ful care unceasing. She will shower her with mail, flowers, and books. Furthermore, she resolves never to let herself be 
ailing again. 

Dr. Foust's office hours for students are from 11:00 to 12:30 in the morning and from 5:15 to 6:00 o'clock in 
the afternoon. Whether the chairs in the hall outside his door are always full of waiting students at these hours has not 
been determined, but this much is known for a certainty: no student has ever, in our knowledge, obtained a hearing with the 
President, without first serving a considerable term of probation in the hall. After many trips, she does obtain her place 
on the first chair outside and is then bidden enter that door from which there can be no withdrawal once it is passed. She 
is invited to take a seat on one of those slippery leather chairs, and after perching herself perilously on the edge of one 
of them, or establishing herself firmly on it, her feet, meanwhile, swinging two inches from the floor, she states her errand, 
wondering if Dr. Foust can hear her heart pounding. He purses up his lips judiciously, adjusts his glasses, swings around 
and views the landscape, and performs other disconcerting acts. Now if the young lady lack that quality commonly known 
as stick-to-itiveness, she decides she had better go. She came to ask permission to drop Math, but to her, all the signs 
show it is a useless fight. Anyway it is a rather cowardly thing to give up a subject merely because one loathes it so 
unspeakably and is making no progress in it. Hence she retreats in confusion agreeing with what she knows Dr. Foust will 
say before he has more than begun saying it. Thereafter she kicks herself regularly before and after each Math recitation, 
and declares privately she never had a fair chance. 

If, on the other hand, she possesses quite a ready supply of moral courage, she will engage in a debate of greater or 
less length, depending upon the seriousness of the question at issue, and the number of arguments she has at her tongue's 
end. At length, she acknowledges her defeat in this battle of the wits, and withdraws in good order. This type of student 



Page ta>o hundred one 



usually interviews the President often in behalf of various organizations, and occasionally wins her point. The strict standard 
applied to every case is a very substantial obstacle in the way of schemes not founded on definite and accepted logic. 
Therefore it is the best training in the world to have to plan enterprises that will pass muster over the President's desk. 




Page Into hundred two 




Page two hundred three 



\ 



Normal Recipes 

A choice collection of recipes made by the Annual Board 
and frequently tested by individual students of the College. 



X Y Z. 

Stir indiscriminately the following: 

3 papers in Junior Literature; 
6 topics in Economics; 

4 drawings for Psychology; 

1 set of cardboard figures in Sophomore Math. ; 

1 five-minute talk on the Dative Case in Junior Latin. 

Bake overnight and serve cold in slices. 

DODGERS 

1 sprained ankle at gym period; 

1 sore throat on vocal music class; 

1 severe eye-strain just before note-books must be in; 

1 headache on recital day; 

1 incurable cough, particularly violent when fear of 

being called on strikes the student. 
NOTE: — These are too frequently served to be consid- 
ered a delicacy in this vicinity. 



GINGERBREAD 

23 pages of soft talk from a U. N. C. Freshman; 

1 hour of Junior Latin — teacher in a bad humor; 
3 measures of athletic enthusiasm; 

2 study hours applied to lessons only. 
Mix thoroughly and bake quickly. 

HASTY PUDDING 

5 minutes' run to breakfast; 

3 minutes' rush to class after last bell has rung; 
45 minutes desperate note-taking; 

1 minutes rush to gym ; 

4 minutes rush through a crowded post-office between 
classes ; 

3 study hours of frantic cramming just before exami- 
nations. 
Season with 3 callers and 5 borrowers per hour. 



Page lv>o hundred four 



\ 




Senior Statistics 

Miss Moore's Scribe Belle Lupton 

Most Appreciative RuTH GuNTER 

Most Talkative Esther Horn 

Most Accommodating Alice Robbins 

Pepper Box Margaret Smith 

Greatest Borrower Willie May Stratford 

Hardest Knocker Mary Green 

Most Sleepy-headed Jeannette Musgrove 

Horn Blower Willie May Stratford 

Bossiest Bessie Terry 

Vanity Box , Pattie Groves 

Biggest Loafer Sarah Shu ford 

Foreordained Old Maid May McQueen 

Most Reserved Elizabeth Long 

Chief Point-Misser Louise Alexander 



Page ln>o hundred five 



' 




Senior English 

The English class dolh now assemble; 

A motley crowd it doth resemble. 

Mr. Smith hurries from his home in the dell 

To get to the Normal at the ringing of the bel 

All armed with books he comes to classes, 

And scarce takes time to wipe his glasses. 

Then doth he say: "To take time 

To call the roll would be a crime. 

To business now. Your instructor 

Considers this book by Mrs. Orr 

A gem regarding Mr. Browning; 

But much better though 

Is this volume by Berdoe." 

And while he stands there thus expounding. 

There is heard in the hall a trampling of feet; 

To get to the gym we must be fleet. 

— Margaret Sparger. 




~fk.c <Etwri_ 4 H'-staiy^ 



Page two hundred 1 six 




A deathly hush is o'er the room, 
One speaker's voice alone is heard 
Solemnly preaching Browning's word. 
A stealthy watch is drawn, and glance 
Meets anxious glance throughout the class — 
Throughout the class slight movements pass, 
As in the hall now waxes strong 



Senior Gym 

Commotion great and ominous. 
Do moving feet create that fuss, 
Or the instructors imagination? 
Indeed, 'tis feet; and up they start, 
These six score other feet — and dart 
Like lightning from that lecture room. 
Away! away! out of the way! 
Or death will be your lot to-day. 
They're in a hurry, can't you see? 



Don't mind the flurry, let them be. 
Belt in hand, and brooch in mouth, 
Jacket flying straight to the South, 
Soon but a gray streak vanishing West, 
Why do they run? Well, they know best 
Their own dire, dreadful, awful fate 
If they're a single second late. 



(Five minutes later, near Senior Hall). 
One by one, black imps appear. 
Saunter sadly, smiling drear, 
Straight to the dreadful door of the gym. 
Everybody's doing it, doing it, doing it, 
Doing what? — dances aesthetic, my dear! 
Side, behind, in front, and up! 
Side, behind, in front, and up! 
Listen to the music, don't you hear? 



Backward, forward, sidewise bend! 
Forward, sidewise, backward twist! 
Will they break? O, never fear, 
They're double jinted, waste no tear. 
Upside downward, forward jump! 
Quick reverse, and backward whirl! 
Deeply breathe now, one and two! 
Senior gym, excuse me, do! 

— Eleanor Morgan. 



Page tao hundred seven 



AsS 



Di 



eniors uream 



On! Cn! Cn! 

Fiercely, fiercely on I ride, 
By me whirling far and wide 
Trees and rocks and human things, 
In my ears a whizzing sings, 
Tis the fatal, buzzing sound, 
Warns me that the world turns round ; 
Topsy-turvy, in and out, 
Meteors flying round about. 
Pell-mell through it all I flee, 
Neck and neck, the thing and me, 
Heeding not the precipice place, 
On and on the fearful pace, 
Stop! the sudden awful jolt 
Drives me like a lightning bolt 
Straight in'o the bounding space. 
'Tis Eternity I face. 
But 1 see in revolution 
Behind me standing Evolution, 
Grinning ape-like down at me, 
The thing is Sociology! 



Down! Down! Down! 

Head-on like a rocket drive; 

Splash into the lake I dive, 

Down ! Down ! Down ! 

Till a strong wave lifts me high, 

Bears me gently as a sigh. 

Wafts me o'er a strange threshold, 

Where the air blows clear and cold, 

Where the light glows clear and bright, 

Blue and yellow, red and white, 

Sending opalescent gleams 

O'er the hall in rainbow beams; 

All of static currents made, 

With a swirling palisade, 

Shines my liquid palace here. 

Now from nothing, lo, appear 

In a grave discourse engaged 

Two brave youths with a man much aged, 

Cato! Ah, will he, will he 

Speak in English Senectule? 

Alas, my hope is smashed to earth, 

Neptune now in fiendish mirth, 

Raging forth in sudden might. 

Plunges all in darkest night, 

Sets the waters roaring loud, 

Churns the waves in violence proud, 

Till they toss me, toss me far, 

Like a broken driftwood spar, 

Torn and mangled on the beach. 



Page two hundred eight 



AS SENIORS DREAM 



Rest! Rest! Rest! 

Peace, sweet peace, alas, too sweet! 

Soon, quick trampings o'er me beat, 

O'er my body, o'er my head, 

Over all my rocky bed; 

Tiny fingers jerk my hair, 

Thin, shrill voices fill the air, 

As they beat me back to life, 

Back to sense and back to strife; 

Push me, pull me up and down, 

Drive me, whip me round and round 

The spiral method, hop-scotch game. 

Hop and hop and hop, so lame, 

Try and try and try in vain 

The five formal steps to gain; 

And yet somehow all the while. 

As I hop each extra mile, 

Vaguely dawns the consciousness 

This is nonsense, nothing less, 

For, while games outside begin, 

Spiral methods start within; 

Till at last I fain would die, 

But — a strong wind bears me high. 



Up! Up! Up! 
Up, and up, and up! 
Suns and planets passing by, 
Midway heaven alone I fly. 
Ah! the music of the spheres 
Moves my heart to radiant tears, 
Melody, strange sweet and fair, 
Harmony, sublimely rare, 
"Up, the pinnacled glory" flies, 
And my heart its answer cries, 
While rich cadence echoes long 
Sweet the angel's glorious song, 
Li3t! a single long, full moment. 
Hushed the stars, the angels silent, 
Hark ! for Robert Browning speaks : 
"On the earth, the broken arcs; in the heaven, 
a perfect round"! 



And the Eastern red glows pink in the West, 
As Prep, dread prep-bell breaks my rest, 
Too late, too late to learn my Ped, 
Too near, too near, O dizzy head, 
The brink of Sociology, 
Too late to read Senectute. 
But ah! these cares are slight in truth, 
For I must join the race forsooth, 
The mad race for the dining room door. 
Alas! for the dream of the night is o'er! 
— Eleanor Morgan. 



Page two hundred nine 




THE PENSIVE GAZE 



Page (D)o hundred ten 




WHEN THE THERMOMETER IS LOW 



Page two hundred eleven 




IN OUR ROOMS 



Page lixo hundred twelve 



The Last Will and Testament of the Class of 1914 

Morituri salutamus! 

We, the Class of 1914, having come through the ordeal of Seniorhood sound in body and actually in mind, and 
realizing that the end of our lives, as students, is drawing near, do generously give, bequeath, and in some cases thrust upon 
the persons, departments, and organizations hereinafter mentioned, the following legacies: — 



IMPRIMIS. 
To THE CLASS OF 1915 we bequeath: — 

1. Our College. Of course this is not really ours to 
give, but we thought we owned it; so we give you 
the right of laboring under the same delusion. 

2. Full privileges of Seniorhood, which being many, 
constitute a heavy burden. These include the title 
and right of way to run a shopping agency to 
Hooper's store and the Washington Steam Bakery. 

3. A cement walk to Senior House, in order that the 
paths of your lives as upper classmen will not afford 
quite so many opportunities to slip. 

4. Our sincere wishes for a happy 1915. These wishes 
come from the bottom of our hearts which you so 
artfully affected on St. Valentine's Night. 



ITEM II. 
To the Class of 1916, we tender: — 

1 . The wonderful anticipations of being Seniors. 

2. A small sum of money as a "nest-egg," from the 
surplus, if there is any, of our Annual publication. 

3. Sympathy — should you be so rash as to publish an 
Annual, and a great deal of advice, consisting 
mostly of "dont's." 

ITEM III. 
To the Class of 1917, we are happy to give: — 

1. The distinction of no longer being called "Fresh." 

2. A few "hand-me-downs" from the other classes out 
of consideration for your limited numbers. 



Page ln>o hundred thirteen 



2. Our banner bearing our colors — Green and White. 
May they have many opportunities to wave over your 
triumphs. Let them serve as a reminder of the 
Class of 1914, helping you preserve our memory 
and traditions. 

3. Our hearts. 

ITEM V. 
To Our Esteemed Faculty: — 

We leave many, many copies of Life, the most humor- 
ous number too, which we beg them to read carefully 
and most frequently, and apply the spirit in their deal- 
ings with the students. 



To 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 
ITEM IV. 

To the Preparatory Class, those who are naturally 
nearest and dearest to us, we graciously leave: — 

1 . Our class box as a stronghold, with all its disorderly 
contents composed chiefly of much space and a rusty 
key. 



To 



To 



To 



To 



OF THE CLASS OF 1914 
ITEM VI. 

THE DINING-ROOM DEPARTMENT: 

We give all the pumpkin, x y z, and mutton that we 
could not eat. 

NOTE: — We do this grudgingly but of necessity. 

ITEM VII. 
Miss Moore, Our Registrar: — 
As a token that we never forget, we proffer a copy of 
the Rubaiyal, to us the cause of much torment, to be 
laid away on the shelf in dust forever. 

ITEM VIII. 

the Young Women's Christian Association: — 
We give a chatauqua salute. 

ITEM IX. 
the Dramatic Club: — 
We surrender Pattie Groves' cosmetics. 

ITEM X. 
the Department of Mathematics: — 
We generously give Bertha Stanbury's knowledge of 
Algebra, to be divided evenly among those whose need 
for it is most pressing. 



Page two hundred fourteen 







LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF THE CLASS OF 1914 



ITEM XI. 

To the Music Department: — 

We give a large quantity of the volume of Louise 
Alexander's voice, without which she will still have a 
sufficiency. 

ITEM XII. 
To the English Department: — 

We give just a pinch of pessimism to counteract the 



ITEM XIII. 

To the Science Department: — 

We leave the long-sought-for discovery of perpetual 
motion personified in the visible form of Ruth Faison at 
examination time. 

ITEM XIV. 
To the Department of Physical Training: — 
We leave a variation of the tango. 



effect of Browning's optimism. 

ITEM XV. 
Finally, to the History Department: — 

We tender the right to emphasize 1914 as an epoch 
making date in history. 

As Residuary Legatee we name Nannie Hawkins Johnson, because if there is anything left over after this generous 

will, we think that by right of faithful service and discharge of duties, she is entitled to the "pickings." Furthermore, we 

appoint as sole executrix of this estate said Nannie Johnson, and we rely on her to carry out faithfully these, our last wishes. 

In testimony whereof, we have put our hand and seal, on this, the twenty-fifth day of May, in the year of our Lord. 

One Thousand Nine Hundred Fourteen, at the State Normal College, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Witnesses: (Signed), CLASS OF 1914. 

Dr. Foust 
Miss Kirkland 
Iris Holt 



/'age Iwo hundred fifteen 






Labor Day, November 5, 1913 

Leaves to the right of them, 
Leaves to the left of them, 
Dancing and fluttering; 
Out with the rake and hoe 
Glad that they might go, 
Went the six hundred. 

Leaves now all gathered in; 
Bags there to put them in, 
Full and o'erflowing; 
Back with the rake and hoe 
Glad that they might go 
Went the six hundred. 

— Edith Avery. 




Page Iido hundred sixteen 



: 



Seven Wonders of the College 

WE WONDER:— 

1 . What becomes of all the new library fiction. 

2. How many goats are slaughtered to furnish us with the weekly (not weakly) 
goat pie. 

3. Where all the lost articles so profusely advertised for really are. 

4. What the Faculty think we think of them. 

5. How the new girls get so fat on Normal fare. 

6. What they say about us in Faculty Council meetings. 

7. What would become of the College if the phrase, "What one can do, six 
hundred have the right to do", were forever abolished from the campus. 



Page two hundred seventeen 




SCENE ON FIELD DAY 



Page tivo hundred eighteen 




SUNDRY SCENES IN THE PARK 



Page livo hundred nineteen 




Page two hundred twenty 




SCENE IN PEABODY PARK 



Page (n>o hundred iv>enty-one 




Page tmo hundred twenty-ltvo 




-AND AFTER 



Page fn>o hundred tv>enl\)-ihree 




Trie i-No. 



Page two hundred twenty-four 



I 






Page /D'c hundrea twenty-five 



THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
NORMAL qnd INDUSTRI AL COLLEGE 

CULTURE, SCHOLARSHIP, SERVICE, SELF-SUPPORT 

Offers to woman a liberal education, equipment for service, 
professional training for remunerative employment 

^T^ELL planned courses leading to degrees in Arts, Science, Pedagogy, 
\ks Music and Household Economics. <J Special courses in Pedagogy; 
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halls, gymnasium, music rooms, teachers' training school, infirmary, model 
laundry, central heating plant, and open-air recreation grounds. <J Dormi- 
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who pledge themselves to become teachers. ^ The regular session opens in 
September. The Summer session will open June 2. 



For Catalogue and othe 
information, address 



r JULIUS I. FOUST, President, Greensboro, N. C. 



\ 



Normal Students will find a 
large and well selected stock of 

Bracelets, Waist Sets, Crosses, Chains 

La Valliers, Pendants, Lockets, 

Brooches, Rings and Pins 



AND A LARGE WELCOME WITH 

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We also manufacture VITRIFIED CONDUIT PIPE for covering large steam pipes where 
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ties of this material for the State Normal College at Greensboro, Winthrop College 
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Prices on Application POMONA TERRA COTTA CO., Pomona, N. C. 



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TELEPHONE 245 1005 SPRING GARDEN STREET 

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MISS LEANNA CURTIS 

EXCLUSIVE MILLINERY 

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Send to Headquarters 

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and you hear it every- % 
where, when you want 
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In its daily operations we are guided by one 
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We say openly what we mean and promise 
only just what we can give in full round measure. 
Straightforwardness in all our dealings, candor 
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quick, courteous and efficient service are fun- 
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On this basis have our public dealings been 
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You can meet all your college ex- 
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We guarantee you a stated sum for 
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This plan is endorsed by President 
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Send today for full particulars. 

REVIEW OF REVIEWS' 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

H. W. FOLY, Manager 
30 Irving Place NEW YORK 



■VI 'i'>ClNT° fjOOAltW 

pURRENT 
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Former/S^^ CURRENT LITERATURE 



i uni n \:\ • i .m:\nj i uiim 1 1 ; 




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HfcCl'RRIN'l LITERATURE PUBLISHING CO. rtl West WSt, N.Y 



V^HE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
y^J NORMAL COLLEGE stands first 

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Send to-day for free prospectus giving full 

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CURRENT OPINION 
SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

134-140 West 29th Street, NEW YORK 



•Get it at OD ELL'S - 
Qyality First 



Keep a Pidture Record of Your College Days 




The value of such a record cannot be 
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GREENSBORO, N. C. 



We recommend The Giendale School and College Theme Tablet 
(Copyright 1911, by J. R. Rutland) 

BECAUSE— 

1. It aids the English teacher and her pupils by giving in 
concise form such rules and suggestions as a young writer 
needs. 2. It saves her time by numbering these rubs so that 
she can readily refer to them in correcting errors in the 
pupil's themes. 3. It contains sheets of standard size anil 
quality, such as should be used in all papers written out of 
class in all subjects. J. It makes the best exaim nation 
tablet. 5. The paper is of excellent quality. 6. It is the 
tablet for all written exercises. 

ADOPTED BY STATE OF ALABAMA. 

The pupil cannot learn to write well except by writing 
frequently. He gives his closest attention to exercises written 
on good paper with pen and ink. Therefore many of the 
exercises should be written on good paper with pen and ink. 
We believe that the Giendale School and College Theme Tab- 
let will give the best of service to both tacher and pupil. 

Sold exclusively by THE HIRSHBERG COMPANY 
18, 15, 17 Nelson Street ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

"GLENDALE KINK" School Supplies and 
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The Celebrated 



Greensboro's Main Drug Stores. The Store That 
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INFIRMARY 

TELEPHONE 30 GREENSBORO, N. C. 



J. W. FRY, President 



J. S. COX. V. Pres. 



W. E. ALLEN, Sec'y & Treas 



Gkmmnnrn Sloan Sc (Urnst Gin. 

Gapital, Surplus and Profits, $275,000.00 

Invites accounts of every kind. Sells Traveler's Checks 
Payable Throughout the World, and Pay 4 Per Cent on 
Savings. 



A Good Place to do Your Banking 



THE 



GREENSBORO 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

Greensboro, N. C. 



A. M. ELLINGTON, R. R. KING A. H. ALDERMAN 

President Vice-President Cashier 



BED $13.50 COUCH 




This makes a nice 
Couch when closed 
and when open it 
makes a complete 
Bed with National 
Spring and Felt 
Mattress 



HUNTLEY- STOCKTON -HILL CO. 

UNDERTAKERS 



EVERY 

ription 



RUBBER GOODS 8L E 

Wholesale and Retail 



DEALERS IN 

Sporting Goods, Tennis Shoes, Rain Coats 
Water Bottles, Etc. 

MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED 

Hope Rubber Co. 



97 Westminster Street 



PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Jos. J. Stone & Company 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 




PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

Catalogues, Magazines and Booklets 



Miss Selma Lamb & Co. 

MILLINERY 
10 PER CENT DISCOUNT 
TO NORMAL GIRLS 

1 1 8 North Elm Street 

Greensboro, N. C. 


C. W. BANNER, M.D. 

Banner Building 
Greensboro, N. C. 

PRACTICE LIMITED TO THE 

EYE, EAR, NOSE and 
THROAT 

Office Hours: 9 A.M. to 1 P.M., 2:30 P.M. to 5 P.M. 


S. C. Gilmer & Company 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS 
and READY-TO-WEAR 


Try A. E. Fordham & Co. 


For Your Next Shoes 

Our Spring line is complete. We have all grades 
and prices to suit all. We think we have just what 
you want, and will make the price to suit you. 


SPECIAL KID GLOVES FOR $1.00 


You will Save by Trading at 

320-322 S. ELti St, Greensboro, N. C, 


1 1 8 West Market Street. 
Greensboro, N. C. 


Patronize Our Advertisers 



CJThe engravings in this Annual were made by 



Gray- Adams Engraving Co. 

Artists, Designers, Engravers, Electrotypers 
Color Plate Makers 




OFFICES AND WORKS 

1324 Washington Avenue 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



r 



^ 



This Book is a Sample of Our Work 



We make a specialty of high grade School and College 
Printing, such as Catalogs, Annuals, Booklets, Programs, 
etc. — have one of the best and most modern printing 
plants in the entire South. We printed this year Annuals 
for such institutions as Vanderbilt University, Tulane Uni- 
versity, Meridian College and Conservatory, North Carolina 
State Normal and Industrial College, Howard College, Ten- 
nessee College, Boscobel College, and many others. 
Write for our beautifully illustrated specimen 
book — a postal will do